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BaroNova?

Well this is something interesting?

  • FDA has granted premarket approval to BaroNova for a device to treat obesity that is inserted into the stomach, where it delays gastric emptying. It is removed after 12 months.
  • The device, called the TransPyloric Shuttle system, is placed and removed through the mouth in an endoscopic procedure.
  • Approval was based on the company’s 270-patient pivotal study in which people treated with the device lost three timesmore weight on average than patients who had a sham procedure in the control group.

Dive Insight:

Despite obesity prevalence at 39.8% in 2015-16, affecting about 93.3 million U.S. adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, therapeutic options have not made a dent. Conditions linked to obesity include heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer.

Stubbornly high rates globally show the need for an effective treatment, despite substantial public health efforts to address the problem. Optimism at the start of the decade about progress has been tempered, according to a 2018 editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The AMA recognized obesity as a disease in 2013. 

When lifestyle modifications are not enough, physicians may prescribe weight-loss medications or suggest weight-loss surgery. BaroNova’s system offers a non-surgical option.

The BaroNova device is indicated to treat obesity in patients with a body mass index of 30-40 kg/m2. The company’s clinical study met its primary endpoints for percent total body weight loss 12 months after the procedure and the proportion of subjects in the treatment groupachieving 5% total body weight loss. Approximately 67% of people treated with the device lost 5% or more of their body weight, exceeding the pre-specified performance target of 50%. Forty percent (40%) of those treated with the device lost 10% or more of their weight.

The Mayo Clinic lists several surgical options to treat obesity. They include gastric bypass, in which the surgeon creates a pouch at the top of the stomach that is connected to the small intestine, allowing food and liquid to bypass most of the stomach. Other surgical approaches include gastric banding, where bands are placed at the top of the stomach to leave a small portion available for food. Biliopancreatic diversion and gastric sleeve procedures both involve removing part of the stomach.

Last week, FDA granted De Novo clearance to an edible hydrogel capsule that releases absorbent particles that swell in the stomach to create gel pieces with the firmness of plant-based foods, meant to create a feeling of fullness. The mechanical modes of action involve mean it’s regulated as a medical device.

In 2015, FDA approved an implantable, vagus nerve blocking neuromodulation device from EnteroMedics, now known as ReShape Lifesciences. A pulse generator implanted under the skin in the abdomen sends electrical signals via wire leads and electrodes to the vagus nerve. 

Also in 2015, FDA approved two intragastric balloon devices sold by manufacturers ReShape and Apollo Endosurgery. In 2016, FDA approved a third balloon system, made by Obalon, that delivers three balloons in a swallowable capsule that are filled with air. 

In 2017, FDA alerted the public to complications with the liquid-filled devices, including four deaths tied to the Orbera balloon made by Apollo and one death linked to the ReShape balloon.

Other device-based treatments on the market include Aspire Bariatrics’ AspireAssist that uses a surgically placed tube to drain some stomach contents and PureTech’s edible hydrogel capsule, called Plenity, intended to create a feeling of fullness.

MamaJuli

It’s crazy to think…

MamaJuli

(Me in 2003 with baby Juli)

That when I (and my husband) was going in to have my gastric bypass surgery, my kids were just little things or not even born yet. 

My daughter that's allowing me to share  (we have two doing this) — she was born in 2002 and I had surgery in 2004.  She was just a toddler, in fact, I weaned her literally the day I went in for surgery.  She went on vacation with the inlaws and allowed me to relax post op instead of worrying about picking up, putting down.  Her entire childhood has been living with me and dad with our respective altered guts.

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In the beginning, I thought that shaking things up would stop the genetic tornado we had going on with so much familial obesity, but I think our surgeries created a microscope of eating issues and only made it harder for the kids. 

Like the kids say:  we always have healthy food available, but we made a big deal about junk in the early years and I think that Really Caused A Problem with snacking, etc.  We didn't really mean to be the food police, but it happened.  I try not to NOW, but with another toddler that would eat nothing but Cheeto dust if allowed — we have to be a bit careful, but not.  Does that make any sense?!

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(Juli in September 2018, pre-program)

My daughter’s pre-op update

In her own words from her post with typos!  

(I will add my experiences of these processes as the Parent-Of-Patients soon. I HAVE SOME THINGS TO SAY.  It’s very hard to find time to write like I used to— I have been waiting for my smallest child to settle down and not find him on a ceiling fan.  This is being posted from the bathroom, with him.)

Anyway — her quick post from yesterday —

Update:

   About four months ago I made a huge decision that is going impact the rest of my life; I started to take part in the WLS program at Boston Children’s Hospital, which most of you know. In the beginning I had barely any idea of how any of this worked and if I would even be able to lose anything. What I didn’t know was the motivation that comes with having to meet with people, and having to have lost weight before the next monthly appointment to be able to stay/ move forward in the program. 

     At my first appointment with OWL (Optimal Weight loss for Life) which is the first step in the WLS program, I was really unsure how successful I would be in the month to come while she was explaining it. But, I went to my second appointment and I had lost 13lbs which was a HUGE accomplishment for me. After this appointment I was not only shocked at what I had done it motivated me to do more for my next appointment; at the third and final appointment with OWL I had lost 5lbs which is less than the first but still an accomplishment that I was content with, although I could have done more.

        Last month I had my first meeting with the WLS program; this is when it really set in that this was going to happen. At this appointment I met the team of doctors that I am going to be working with through out the next 6 months (if all goes as planned) this team includes a dietitian, social worker, Nurse Practitioner, Psychologist, and of course Surgeon. This first appointment with them went very well they approved me for the program and gave me goals and a cool binder that has all of the foods and drinks I should be eating and what I have to do to be able to do the surgery in the time frame that I would like to; all of this was to set me up for the month until my next appointment. At my next appointment I was unsure of how I did, I hadn’t weighed myself, I honestly thought I had gained; But I didn’t I lost 12lbs which really boosted my motivation and confidence levels because now I have lost a total of 30lbs which is absolutely crazy! I am currently waiting for my next appointment at the end of March where I am hoping to do even better than last time. I am very excited to see where the next few months take me and see what the progress is like so I can reach my end goal in the WLS program!

Gastric bypass surgery causes type 2 diabetes to go into remission in most patients

Gastric bypass surgery causes type 2 diabetes to go into remission in most patients.

A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) has found that three quarters of individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who were treated with obesity surgery known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) experienced diabetes remission within one year of treatment.

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Plus Size Prom Dress

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Shopping for a prom dress is never fun.  Nope.  Never.  No.  

At least that's the impression I have always had. 

I have been through three prom dress purchases with my own girls (and two of my own) — and I'll tell you — it would simply be a lot easier to slide into a size __ (…after trying on countless!) rather than having to dig through a vvveeerrrrrry limited number of plus-sized dresses and only getting to try on one or two.   All the girls in the dressing room are picking up size zeroes and twos and fours and some are in tears about needing to get the dresses altered to fit – because – they're just too big.  I am looking around at a sea of teenagers ALL. WEARING. THE. SAME. COLOR. (they always do this) and wonder why it's such a big deal.  (I know, because it's the PROM.  And YOU HAVE TO.  We all – mostly? – do it.)

After getting measured, we find that she's *exactly* a size __ and we ordered the dress she wanted out of the catalog.  It was a bit disheartening to think that the prom is this year – and she doesn't get the chance to do it next year in senior year when she might be post-surgery.  It would be kind of cool to slither into a smaller size, she knows that.  Someone will need to get married or something so we can all get fancied up in a year.  

SO ANYWAY.  We put $100 down, and have to pay the balance when it comes in.  Let's hope it fits!  She matches the EXACT MEASUREMENTS of the dress, sooooo……

 

 

It appears you have to pay to keep your blog active. Hello. *tap tap, is this thing on?*

BABY SHARK DOO DOO DO DOO

 
 

Baby Shark does what?

A post shared by MMBBGC (@mmbbgc) on

I will find you, BABY SHARK makers.  

This is the first child of mine with early knowledge of YouTube. This kid (like millions out there, is obsessed with toy unboxing videos, specifically dinosaurs if you wanted to know…) and it's all. on. YouTube. 

Thousands of toy unboxing videos, from around the globe, made … badly.  With the same background music.  "Look at this VELOCIRAPTOR!  LET'S CHECK OUT THE SET!"

I did not even know This Was A Thing, and I used to Make (bad) Review Videos (with no edits, because I don't know how) and here is my 2.5 year old telling me!! to "DINOSAUR SHOW!" and BABY SHARK.  

 

 

 

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14 Years.

I didn't make a 12 or 13 year update?  Really?  It might be the distracted distraction: 
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It occured to me that I don't have photos to share, partly because I have been sitting at the same. exact. weight. (within five or so pounds) for two-and-a-half years (*see distraction) and there's really nothing to update in that aspect.  
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I started "this journey" more than 15 years ago.
 
My highest weight was 320 pounds.  I have reached a low weight of 145 lbs, once.  I gained over 210 lbs. while pregnant in 2006 and 2015. 
 
I have spent the majority of the last 14 years at or about 170 lbs.  
 
All of this is in the history here on the blog.
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Self – last week
 
I would say that 170 is my eat-what-you-want and "don't do jack shit for cardio aside from chasing a hyperactive toddler/house cleaning and seizure" weight.
 
What do I eat?
 
Old-lady food.  I still loathe cooking.  I would not cook a thing, ever, if there weren't kids here.  I don't cook much anyway, since I was told "not to ever use a knife unattended" or "a stove," so, I just … do, but I don't.  If money were no object, I'd be all over home delivery.
 
Coffee with almond milk, tea, whole grain toast, probiotic cottage cheese, frozen meals, chicken salad.
 
I mix it up with a take out meal about once a week, usually a cold sandwich like roast beef and all the veggies or a BLT.  
 
I regret most meals eaten away from home, so I am careful about food choices if we go out.  I trust no one not to kill me.  I dump on the most random things, or have awful reactions later, so I stick with what Should Work.  
 
I'd say I take in 1500 or so calories most days. Today?  
  • Dave's Killer Bread + Light Butter
  • Two bites protein cookie, the rest donated to the kid
  • Frozen chicken a la king, tossed some of the chicken away
  • And it's nearing 5pm.  Typical.  I'll eat dinner at bedtime.
 
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Bob and I at his police graduation, 2017, his 14 years is next month
 
I have that excess 20- 25 lbs hanging around.  I know how to lose it. I don't do it. At least I have not in the last few years. With my last (POST WLS!) baby who is now eleven, I would get walking for miles, but I don't anticipate that happening anytime soon with my special-fall-on-the-ground-head-crack seizures that developed in the last few years (*see the timing correlation?) Well, at least I did it back then and did not realize I was falling down.
 
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Christmas Day, 2017 – Myself and all the "kids"
 
I have two cardio machines in the house. I'm not using them and my excuse is the youngest child that climbs on them with me. (YOU HAVE TO KNOW HIM.  HE IS THAT CHILD.)  Getting up before he does or climbing out of bed after he sleeps to exercise is … not tempting. I'm just not that into it, yet.  Clearly exercise is not a priority. 
 
I think that remaining upright — is?
*On that topic which some of you don't like to read, but it's a huge part of my life/day — I'm taking lots of medications, which need a little tinkering (again, usually once a year I'm in the hospital for a tune up) since I am obviously having lots of seizure activity.   I currently take ONFI, Topamax, Banzel, and as needed Lorazepam.  They are treating my various types of seizures.  I just tapered off of a huge amount of Keppra. I suspect these will change in the near future, because me.
 
People ask me if I blame my gastric bypass for this "condition" or it's increasing changes/etc.  No.  I was born with the brain malformation that causes seizures, and at this point in my life I believe I had seizure activity longer than anyone knew (maybe since I was very small, in the form of smaller seizures that no one noticed, I understand the symptoms now) — but the gastric bypass caused a trigger by changing my gut.  The science shows that the gut can affect the brain — and I feel that in some way the WLS lowered my seizure threshold by altering my gut, and making my malformation — "turn on" and show it's full power.  I feel that there's a cure in my lifetime, if it's fecal transplants, brain stimulators or who knows what else – because there are many of us out there with post WLS seizures
 
What do you want to know about "long term" post weight loss surgery life?  
 
Any questions, I am a too-open book.  Ask here or Facebook.  Just don't sell me anything unless you plan on sending it to me free.
 
 
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Optimum Nutrition Protein Cake Bites

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There was a time, long long ago, where I'd buy a bag of glazed mini-donuts and They Were My Crack.  That waxy chocolate covering — and cakey interior — a carby, sugary calorie death.

This is not that product.  That is what triggered me to PICK IT UP.

These "Protein Cake Bites" look suspiciously like a carby-sweet product on the packaging, but I'm going to tell you IT IS A TRICK.

What I found were miniature waxy glazed protein pucks.  The outside is a white yogurt covering with sprinkles, leading to a thick and pasty protein center.  (Not cake. Disappointment.)  It is like you took two scoops of protein, pressed them in an espresso maker with … oil.  Maybe that's cake enough for you?   

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The nutrition, better than cake.  Protein *first*, anyway.  Twenty grams of the stuff – if you eat all 240 calories and three pucks.  I do not feel I could eat more than one at a time, texturally it was a difficult sell.

I had one last night, one in the middle of the night and threw the last away.

For what it's worth, these are better as a snack in the middle of the night than something else (…even if it's not my thing) I might have sitting bedside.  I always have bedside OMG LOW BLOOD SUGAR snacks. They'd probably last a year.  

I have some other flavors to try and for photographing.  I'm a little disappointed because I wanted to enjoy these more.  YouTube told me I should.  

  • Product – Optimum Nutrition Protein Cake Bites
  • Price – About $2.10 per pack 
  • Purchased – Local GNC, here's an Amazon link.
  • Pros – Pretty little package, the graphic initially reminded me of donuts from 15 years ago, **sprinkles**, three separate protein snacks in one sleeve, a good to-go shove in your bag snack, 20 grams protein
  • Cons – I can't with the texture.  Lots of carbohydrates if you're counting.
  • Rating – Pending, based on the next flavor I try.  Maybe this was an off pack?