No-Light-Beers

25% Drink 16% Calories Via Alcohol Daily.

About 25% of you drink alcohol every day — given the normal non-weight loss surgical population according to a new CDC study.  And about 16% of your daily calories come from alcohol.  

PS.  Give this study to bariatric patients – I would say from my very non-professional standpoint that results would be higher vs. calorie intake given our higher rates of addictions to All The Things.  

That is some scary daily nutrition math.

No-Light-Beers

Cheers.

CDC

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The U.S. population consumes an average of 100 calories a day from alcoholic beverages. Men, 150 calories; women, 53.

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“If you are drinking an extra 150 calories more than you need a day, those extra calories could end up on your waist or your hips,” said Joan Salge Blake, a clinical associate professor in the nutrition program at Boston University and a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Those excess daily calories could cause you to put on a pound monthly and would add up to over 10 pounds in a year,” Blake said.

Specifically for a gastric bypass patient — it can lead to all sorts of damage.  Play in the Google.  

Holiday-weight-gain

Do you GAIN weight during the holidays?

It is a common idea that people gain weight during the holiday season, and a typical excuse for doing so.

Holiday-weight-gain
What kind of things do you tell yourself?

"I am expected to eat this fudge, cake, pie, grandmas-cookies, holiday-fare, what-have-you, so it's not MY fault that I gain 5-10-15 pounds this holiday season."  (Lies.)

"Everyone WANTS my special holiday candy that I make every year.  I have to make it."  (Bull.)

"I HAVE to cook the pies, holiday breads, sugar cookies, church pot luck foods, party foods, etc, so you can't blame me for gaining."  (LIIIIIES.)

"This candy is only available during this season, I have to buy it and eat it now, or I won't get it."  (Get. OVER. It.)

First thing I need to tell you?  Your pies?  Kind of suck.  Nobody really likes them.  We eat them because you make them, and don't want to make you feel bad because they were left untouched.  Nobody really likes the pies anyway. 

Turns out, that unless you really go overboard — the caloric damage done in the holiday season is about a pound.

Oh.  Not. a. big. deal. at. all.  So why are we making up so many justifications for excess in the season of excess?  Just… because we can?

I guess that might be good enough reason for some.

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I am not willing to take on a liquid diet, diet pills, snort energy powder, or spend hour upon hour in the gym on January 1st to rationalize my baklava habit or 96 ounce bag of M + M's for the next four weeks.   (Which, by the way, isn't happening.)

Thanks, but no thanks.  I had weight loss surgery to AVOID fad diets, crash diets and beyond.

I can handle a pound of weight gain.  I can do that in two hours.  I have bowels of steel.  RAWR.

Washington Post

A classic study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, despite some pretty big claims about weight gain, the average American gains less than a pound during the holiday season. 

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health had seen claims on the news that the average American would gain somewhere between eight and 10 pounds during the holidays. Studies that rely on self-reporting find Americans estimating they gain five pounds during the time period.

The researchers decided to investigate, recruiting 200 people between ages 19 and 82. The sample was representative of the United States in terms of the prevalence of overweight and obese individuals. 

The individuals came in to be weighed in September or October, and then again in February or March. The reserachers found that, on average, the participants gained .37 kilograms, or 0.81 pounds. 

“The subjects believed they had gained four times as much weight as their actual holiday weight gain of 0.37 kg,” the researchers conclude. “Fewer than 10 percent of subjects gained 2.3 kg or more, and more than half of all measurements of weight after the initial one were within 1 kg of the previous measurement.”

N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 23;342(12):861-7.

A prospective study of holiday weight gain.

BACKGROUND:

It is commonly asserted that the average American gains 5 lb (2.3 kg) or more over the holiday period between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day, yet few data support this statement.

METHODS:

To estimate actual holiday-related weight variation, we measured body weight in a convenience sample of 195 adults. The subjects were weighed four times at intervals of six to eight weeks, so that weight change was determined for three periods: preholiday (from late September or early October to mid-November), holiday (from mid-November to early or mid-January), and postholiday (from early or mid-January to late February or early March). A final measurement of body weight was obtained in 165 subjects the following September or October. Data on other vital signs and self-reported health measures were obtained from the patients in order to mask the main outcome of interest.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/-SD) weight increased significantly during the holiday period (gain, 0.37+/-1.52 kg; P<0.001), but not during the preholiday period (gain, 0.18+/-1.49 kg; P=0.09) or the postholiday period (loss, 0.07+/-1.14 kg; P=0.36). As compared with their weight in late September or early October, the study subjects had an average net weight gain of 0.48+/-2.22 kg in late February or March (P=0.003). Between February or March and the next September or early October, there was no significant additional change in weight (gain, 0.21 kg+/-2.3 kg; P=0.13) for the 165 participants who returned for follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

The average holiday weight gain is less than commonly asserted. Since this gain is not reversed during the spring or summer months, the net 0.48-kg weight gain in the fall and winter probably contributes to the increase in body weight that frequently occurs during adulthood.

 





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Leading an Active Lifestyle in a Sedentary World: Your Weight Matters 2012 National Convention

Leading an Active Lifestyle in a Sedentary World: Your Weight Matters 2012 National Convention

This session was led by Tim Church, MD, MPH, PhD

Tim Church, M.D., M.P.H, Ph.D., is Professor of Preventative Medicine at Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University. He has authored over 100 research articles, received numerous awards for preventative health research and co-authored, “Move Yourself, The Cooper Clinic Medical Director’s Guide to All Healing Benefits of Exercise.” Frequently used as an expert source for health stories with national media outlets, Dr. Church interviews with NBC, USA Today, Reuters, Wall Street Journal and CNN. He earned his Medical Degree at Tulane University School of Medicine and is the former Vice President of Medical Research at The Cooper Institute.

Does your proximity to a bar increase your RISK for alcoholism?

Does a person's proximity to a bar trigger over-indulgence?  

A recent study suggests (Duh?!) perhaps it ACTUALLY DOES!  To bring the weight loss surgery community into it — consider locality of bariatric-themed community events.  Where Do The Food Addicts Gather At These Events? Which events get the most attendance?  

A highlight from the OH Conference in Atlanta – Living Thin Within!

Recently the Obesity Help Conference I met this great woman, Jill.  Jill was to speak during the event, but I did not know that, nor did she introduce herself as anyone of importance.  

And we just TALKED AS PEERS.

Let me tell you something —

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Restaurant Discounts For Gastric Bypass Patients May Send Mixed Messages

Please do not give me a reason to patronize restaurants with low-quality food options.  MM needs no reason ON THIS EARTH to step foot in a Golden Corral, Olive Garden, Red Lobster, etc… EVER

Nor do MMs kids.  EVER.  I do not need a trough of pasta, fried seafood or oily iceberg lettuce based salad.

MM Does Not Endorse The Use Of WLS Discount Cards For Food.   We have to learn to eat like normal people.  Having an excuse to pay less for crappy food does not teach us anything.

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NPR - n.pr/UEF2qA

All of these reduced appetites might seem like bad news for the restaurant business, but surgeon-distributed food discount cards aim to make dining out cheaper and more practical for gastric bypass patients.

But is this kind of encouragement really a good idea?

To accommodate the patients' reduced stomach volumes, the cards, called WLS (Weight Loss Surgery) cards, ask restaurants to allow patients to order a smaller portion of food for a discounted price.

These cards aren't a new phenomenon — they've been around in the U.S. at least since the 1990s, and a similar discount programwas proposed to city council members in Campinas, Brazil, earlier this year. 

And like the surgery itself, the WLS cards have grown in popularity, says Ann Rogers, director at the Penn State Surgical Weight Loss Program. "Now there's so much word of mouth about it, that if we forget to give them out [after surgery], the patient says, 'What about those discount cards?' " Rogers says.

Some popular U.S. restaurants accept the cards. For example, Cracker Barrel restaurants allow patients to order from the inexpensive children's menu or order a lunch-sized portion for dinner. In a statement issued to the Salt, Olive Garden and Red Lobster restaurants say they are happy to do the same.

Even "all-you-can-eat" buffet restaurant Golden Corral provides a discounted buffet price upon seeing a proof-of-surgery card in some locations.

Though gastric bypass surgery leaves the patient with a stomach pouch only about the size of an egg, restaurants, especially buffets, still spell trouble for many patients. Unlimited portions and heavily processed, quickly digestible foods that keep patients from feeling full make it difficult to keep the weight off, says Rogers.

Golden Corral could not provide a spokesperson to respond to our inquiries, but it and other companies have made efforts in recent years to add healthier choices to their buffet offerings.

Even if the patient makes better choices, however, friends and family who come along may not do the same. "I definitely discourage patients from going to buffet-style restaurants — it's a danger for everybody," Rogers says.

In fact, Rogers says she discourages her patients from eating at any restaurant. So why distribute a discount card that seems to encourage dining out?

Rogers says it's OK for patients to use the WLS card and splurge at the buffet every once in a while, and the card also encourages them to order smaller meals at other restaurants. If patients make healthy choices about 75 percent of the time, they'll keep the weight off, she says.

But just as the buffet can have negative family health consequences, patients who are diligent about eating well a majority of the time can encourage healthy habits among friends and family. Rogers says patients who attend regular follow-up appointments, some featuring weigh-ins and healthy cooking classes, retain their lost weight about 70 percent of the time.

"For most of our patients, when the patients change their habits, it changes the eating habits of the whole household. It's pretty educational," she says.

Changing habits is critical, she says. It's a myth that the stomach surgery is a permanent weight loss cure. After surgery, "the [hunger] hormones go down and stay down for a year or two. But, slowly, the hunger starts to come back," Rogers says.

 

Alcohol abuse after weight loss surgery? | Harvard Gazette

Alcohol abuse after weight loss surgery? | Harvard Gazette.

 

Experts on the use of bariatric surgery for the treatment of obesity gathered at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study earlier this month for a two-day seminar examining new evidence that stomach surgery for the treatment of obesity has unexpected side effects, including an increased incidence of alcohol abuse among patients.