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Lipozene – TO THE RESCUE! NO.

Lipozene sounds like a pharmaceutical drug doesn't it?

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8 weeks = 3.66 lbs weight loss in a study. "Wow."

LIPOZENE!  (What sounds like a…) HARDCORE FAT BURNER TO THE RESCUE!

It's NOT.

But, the commercials, websites and marketing might make you think so.

It is a fiber - glucomannan –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipozene

A health advisory was released by Health Canada stating the following: "natural health products containing the ingredient glucomannan in tablet, capsule or powder form, which are currently on the Canadian market, have a potential for harm if taken without at least 8 ounces of water or other fluid. The risk to Canadians includes choking and/or blockage of the throat, esophagus or intestine, according to international adverse reaction case reports. It is also important to note that these products should NOT be taken immediately before going to bed."[10] The health advisory was issued after authorization of some products containing glucomannan for the purposes of appetite reduction, weight management, treatment of constipation and management of high cholesterol levels

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"Lipozene is made from the Konjac root, most commonly known as >Glucomannan. This water-soluble fiber expands and acts as a dietary fiber gel in your stomach that helps you feel full, so you eat less and as a result, reach your weight loss goals quicker.

 This water-soluble fiber has been cultivated as a weight loss aid in Japan for generations. In fact, there are even studies that connect its main ingredient Glucomannan with alleviating constipation, reducing cholesterol and regulating blood sugar.

 Lipozene is natural and does not contain any stimulants. There are no known harmful side effects when used as directed.

 Lipozene is not a pharmaceutical drug and is available without a prescription.

You should not be taking this "dietary fiber gel" that "expands" inside your stomach if you have had bariatric surgery.

Stop it and talk to your physician.

 

Salt, Sugar, Fat – Michael Moss

From a Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter at The New York Times comes the explosive story of the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the emerging obesity epidemic. Michael Moss reveals how companies use salt, sugar, and fat to addict us and, more important, how we can fight back.

Valege Lingerie - Click to Enlarge

Oh advertising – (@) (@)

If this is the kind of advertising that they can utilize in France for push-up bras, I can only imagine what might work for plastic surgery.

Valege Lingerie - Click to Enlarge

Valege Lingerie – Click to Enlarge

My mind.  It races, the, um… options?

The US is so backwards sometimes.

Potentially NSFW –  Thanks AdWeek

Who Knew?!

I was sitting here cutting coupons, when this commercial came on the History Channel.  My ADD/epileptic brain immediately honed in on it. "Who Knew!?"

Oh, how I LOVE to HATE these things!  

Life would be so much simpler!  *snort*

"If you want to save time, money, get free stuff, save up to 50% on groceries, and more, then you need the As Seen On TV Who Knew Books! First you'll get Who Knew? with almost 400 pages filled with ten-thousand-one easy solutions to everyday problems! Next, you'll get More Who Knew, with almost 500 pages of money saving secrets! Make food last longer with secrets your grocery store doesn't want you to know! Learn safer, healthier ways to clean without chemicals! The books feature large print, and are easy to use!"

HAPIfok

Hapi Fork – Vibrate your obesity away!

HAPIfok

Introducing the positivity-enhanced HAPIfork!  It is an electronic fork that monitors your personal eating style and habits and gives you cues as to when you are eating too fast.  The HAPIform will alert you with lights and vibrations when you are shoveling food into your piehole.
I have a better idea.  Add moar amps.  Give your Happy A Charge!

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Electricity travels through conductors – any material which allows electrical flow – as it tries to reach the ground. Because people make excellent conductors, minor electrocution is a common household hazard. Fortunately it is usually more surprising than dangerous and does not require medical attention. However, some basic precautions should be taken to insure that the shock does not interfere with the body's normal electrical impulses including the functions of the brain and the heart. Prolonged exposure to a direct source of electricity can also cause severe burns to the skin and the tissue.
It would work faster than a $100.00 vibrating fork.
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Ceelo Green signs with eDiets to lose weight

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CeeLo.  Really?  No, really?  You eat flash-frozen diet-delivery food?  Mr. Lo, you sir, are a multi-millionaire with access to personal chefs and high-end kitchens with additional access to likely The Best Healthcare in the World.  I call bullshit.
"You can change. You can change for the better. You can be a better version of yourself. I choose eDiets because it works."
No, you just ripped off Weight Watchers slogan.  This isn't about eating frozen food. 
KO 20 oz

Coca-Cola + OBESITY + Bad PR.



Oh Coca-Cola!  Is this an admission of guilt?  Finally, you understand?  You get that drinking pure liquid diabetes leads our children to instant weight gain?


KO 20 oz

^ This twenty ounce bottle of typical Coke has more sugar than a typical person requires in a day.  

Please note that I am a bit sugar-shocked and twitchy just reading the label since I can’t handle more than 10-15 grams of sugar at any given time due to my altered (superhero status…) roux en y digestion and reactive hypoglycemia.  If you gave a this blogger a Coke?

…She’d Have A Seizure, Slip Into A Hypoglycemic Coma, And You Could Pay The Ambulance Bill?

Screen Shot 2013-01-15 at 8.05.52 AMIronically, the cause of my potential demise would also be the cure as the Coke could be poured into my facehole to fix my problem.

“Her blood sugar is 20?  GIVE HER A COCA COLA!  STAT!”

Twitch.  Twitch.  Twitch.

But, I digress.  

I haven’t had a regular-sugar soda, or “tonic” as we up heah in Beantown call it — in at least ten years.  Before that maybe a can here and there but oddly, this formerly 320 lb girl is a Diet Coke-head.  

Twitch.

Right.  I never took to the real “sugared” stuff.  Many of my long term weight-loss surgery peers would say that their drink of choice was actually the super high-caffeine sugar Mountain Dew — that is before much of them found coffee drinks.  I was ALWAYS a “Diet” soda drinker, regardless of the FOOD I would eat alongside the drink.

Coca-Cola is finally opening up the discussion – but sort of not really blaming everyone else –  

WAIT – they say – It’s not OUR FAULT –  you just ATE too much.

Remember COKE LOVES YOU.  

We love everyone!  Everyone hug, smile, get together, have a COKE AND SMILE!  GET HAPPY!  PEACE!  SMILE! HUGS AND KISSES!  PAY NO ATTENTION TO THE FAT KIDS HAVING BARIATRIC SURGERY!  Because EVERYTHING is GREAT when WE COME TOGETHER FOR GOOD.  Good is good enough.  We don’t HAVE TO BE PERFECT.  

COKE LOVES YOU JUST THE WAY YOU ARE.

I think I need a new college major.  Advertising hurts my heart.

Coca-Cola to tackle obesity for 1st time in TV ads

Coca-Cola became one of the world’s most powerful brands by equating its soft drinks with happiness. Now it’s taking to the airwaves for the first time to address a growing cloud over the industry: obesity.

The Atlanta-based company on Monday will begin airing a two-minute spot during the highest-rated shows on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC in hopes of flexing its marketing muscle in the debate over sodas and their impact on public health. The ad lays out Coca-Cola’s record of providing drinks with fewer calories and notes that weight gain is the result of consuming too many calories of any kind — not just soda.

For Coca-Cola, the world’s No. 1 beverage company, the ads reflect the mounting pressures on the broader industry. Later this year, New York City is set to enact a first-in-the-nation cap on the size of soft drinks sold at restaurants, movie theaters and sports arenas. The mayor of Cambridge, Mass., has already introduced a similar measure, saying she was inspired by New York’s move.

Even when PepsiCo Inc., the No. 2 soda maker, recently signed a wide-ranging endorsement deal with pop singer Beyonce, critics called for her to drop the contract or donate the funds to health initiatives.

New research in the past year also suggests that sugary drinks cause people to pack on the pounds independent of other behavior. A decades-long study involving more than 33,000 Americans, for example, suggested that drinking sugary beverages interacts with genes that affect weight and enhances a person’s risk of obesity beyond what it would be from heredity alone.

Michael Jacobson, executive director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, was skeptical about Coca-Cola’s ads and said the company would stop fighting soda taxes if it was serious about helping reduce obesity.

“It looks like a page out of damage control 101,” he said. “They’re trying to disarm the public.”

The group has been critical of the soft drink industry and last year released a video parodying Coke’s famous polar bears becoming plagued with diabetes and other health problems.

Coca-Cola said its ads aren’t a reaction to negative public sentiment. Instead, the idea is to raise awareness about its lower-calorie drinks and plans for the coming months, said Stuart Kronauge, general manager of sparkling beverages for Coca-Cola North America.

“There’s an important conversation going on about obesity out there, and we want to be a part of the conversation,” she said.

In the ad, a narrator notes that obesity “concerns all of us” but that people can make a difference when they “come together.” The spot was produced by the ad agencies Brighthouse and Citizen2 and is intended to tout Coca-Cola’s corporate responsibility to cable news viewers.

Another ad, which will run later this week during “American Idol” and before the Super Bowl, is much more reminiscent of the catchy, upbeat advertising people have come to expect from Coca-Cola. It features a montage of activities that add up to burning off the “140 happy calories” in a can of Coke: walking a dog, dancing, sharing a laugh with friends and doing a victory dance after bowling a strike.

The 30-second ad, a version of which ran in Brazil last month, is intended to address confusion about the number of calories in soda, said Diana Garza Ciarlante, a spokeswoman for Coca-Cola Co. She said the company’s consumer research showed people mistakenly thought there were as many as 900 calories in a can of soda.

The company declined to say how much it was spending on the commercials, which it started putting together last summer. It also declined to give details on its plans for the year ahead. But among the options under consideration is putting the amount of activity needed to burn off the calories in a drink on cans and bottles.

The company noted that it already puts calorie counts on the front of its cans and bottles. Last year, it also started posting calorie information on its vending machines ahead of a regulation that will require soda companies to do so by 2014.

Coca-Cola’s changing business reflects the public concern over the calories in soda. In North America, all the growth in its soda unit over the past 15 years has come from low- and no-calorie drinks, such as Coke Zero. Diet sodas now account for nearly a third of its sales in the U.S. and Canada. Other beverages such as sports drinks and bottled water are also fueling growth.

Even with the growing popularity of diet sodas, however, overall soda consumption in the U.S. has declined steadily since 1998, according to the industry tracker Beverage Digest.

John Sicher, the publisher of Beverage Digest, noted that the industry “put its head in the sand” when obesity and soft drinks first started becoming an issue more than a decade ago. Now, he said Coca-Cola is looking to position itself in the public debate rather than being defined by adversaries.