Lane Bryant: Plus-Size Fashion Retailer’s Commercial Reportedly Rejected by Multiple TV Networks

PLEASE. This shit is not indecent, it’s because the women are a little. bit. jiggly.

Get the fuck over yourselves.

Have any of you watched a Vickie’s Secret Ad lately?!

Lane Bryant: Plus-Size Fashion Retailer’s Commercial Reportedly Rejected by Multiple TV Networks The ad, promoting the company’s #ThisBody campaign, was rejected by ABC and NBC, TMZ reported. NBC told TMZ they asked for a “minor edit to comply with broadcast indecency guidelines.”

 

#ThisBody | Lane Bryant

The networks didn’t want you to see this. But we do. Share. Tag. Show everyone what #ThisBody’s made for.

Posted by Lane Bryant on Thursday, March 10, 2016

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The OAC is coming to Boston!

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Via OAC

The OAC is proud to announce that we are debuting a NEW pilot Your Weight Matters Local Events program with YWMLocal – Boston 2014! In less than a month, we will bring the Your Weight Matters message to Boston and the local surrounding community. 

  • We invite you to join us in Boston for this groundbreaking FREE educational event at the Westin Boston Waterfront on November 2, 2014, from 11:30 am – 4:00 pm.

The OAC welcomes our members and their family members, friends and colleagues from all throughout the northeast to this opportunity to experience a local OAC Event! We have secured an amazing line-up of topics and presenters who are ready to arm attendees with knowledge to get you started or back on your journey to improved weight and health. To view the educational topics presented, along with the speakers, please  CLICK HERE.

As part of our commitment to bringing our OAC members the best education and right tools for improving your weight and health, we are proudly producing this first YWMLocal Event, and hope to continue spreading the Your Weight Matters message with YWMLocal Events in other communities across the Nation. This is your chance as a valued OAC Member to connect with the OAC and your fellow OAC members in-person!

Any individual who wishes to benefit from this evidence-based education is welcome to attend, so pleaseshare the news with any family or friends you know in the Boston area! For all OAC members and ANYONE wishing to attend this great FREE event in Boston on November 2, please register now by CLICKING HERE!

Rewind The Future Video Campaign – Blame away the obesity!

An anti-obesity commercial from Strong4Life blames parents, for our children's obesity with a side of french fries and a dose of electronic gadgets.

Is this where I thank my parents?  Uh, no.

The video (now viral!) presents a thirtysomething man (I am 35) whom played video games and ate lots of fast-food start with snapped-Mcdonald's fries from Momma.  

I did not.  I got super morbidly obese anyway.  TAKE THAT STRONG4LIFE.

Marketers and anti-obesity advocates — LISTEN:  IT IS NOT THAT SIMPLE.  Obesity is a multifaceted disease and we cannot simply lay blame on someone's mom and dad (or Mcdonald's!) and hope that that is going to fix the problem.  You cannot blame – shame away a disease, it only makes this one BIGGER.

About Strong4Life —

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta launched Strong4Life, a wellness movement designed to ignite societal change and reverse the epidemic of childhood obesity and its associated diseases in Georgia. 

Based on our clinical behavior change model for treating overweight and obese children, Strong4Life aims to help families achieve sustainable lifestyle change by breaking down the complex issue of childhood obesity into simple steps. 

Strong4Life reaches families through public awareness, policy change efforts, school programs, healthcare provider programs, community partnerships and more. 

Strong4Life makes improving family nutrition and physical activity habits fun and provides parents and caregivers the support they need to accomplish their goals.

Simple Weight Loss Tips

Via CNN –  Simple Weight Loss Tips

Dawn Jackson Blatner, a registered dietitian and nutritionist for the Chicago Cubs, is trying to
change the meaning of the phrase, "Treat yo'self."

Most people treat themselves by indulging in a gallon of ice cream or by lounging around the house,
watching TV. Blatner wants "treat yourself" to mean exactly the opposite. Her definition is designed to give
you more energy, help you lose weight and keep your body healthy.

"It's preplanning your grocery list. It's being in the grocery store and buying foods that nourish your body.
It's eating mindfully," she told the audience at the Obesity Action Coalition's annual Your Weight Matters
convention
. "Those are really good things that when you do them, it's treating yourself right."

In other words, you deserve to feel good and look good, Blatner says. So putting in five or 10 minutes to
plan your meals for the upcoming week or spending 30 minutes at the gym is the ultimate act of self-love.

"There's no bigger gesture in this world that says, 'You know what, Dawn? You matter.'"
Follow these 10 tips to "treat yourself" to a healthier, slimmer body:

These three items ensure you're not sneaking snacks from the
refrigerator late at night or gulping down 1,000 calories in your
car from a fast food joint. And having them probably means
you're consuming more nutrients than a bag of potato chips
would offer — unless you're one of those weird people who
puts potato chips on a plate.

"It's my answer to eating mindfully," Blatner says.

Eating mindfully, research shows, helps people pay closer attention to the enjoyment of eating and to
feelings of fullness. Studies suggest people who eat mindfully consume fewer calories at meals, no matter
how much is on their plate.

2. Willpower is a mental muscle. Exercise it.

Every time you
put food in your
mouth, you should
have three things,
Blatner says: a
table, a plate and
a chair.

Willpower is a limited resource, psychologist Sean Connolly of San Antonio says, but we all have it. The
trick is in knowing how to use it efficiently.

"People list lack of willpower as the No. 1 reason holding them back from improving their lives in some
way," says Connolly, who works regularly with bariatric patients. "Willpower is not a gene. It's a tool that
we all have that we have to learn to use, develop and manage."

Like any muscle, your willpower gets tired. So you have to plan, Connolly says, and know what you will do
in situations that offer a healthy choice and an unhealthy choice. You also have to be prepared for
emergencies, such as at the end of a long work day, when your willpower is exhausted and the drive thru
window beckons.

Willpower also needs to be replenished daily. The best way to do this? Get enough sleep.

3. Be realistic.

Let's be honest, most of us want to lose a lot of weight. And when we don't — when we drop 5 or 10 and
then hit a wall — we get discouraged and jump back on the fried food wagon.

One of the biggest obstacles to losing weight is unrealistic expectations, says psychologist Gary Foster,
director of the Center for Obesity Research and Education at Temple University.

"The less you weigh, the less you need to eat and the more you need to move (to lose weight)," Foster
says. "And that's not fair."

It's nice to aim high, but successful losers drop an average of 8.4% of their body weight. If you weigh in at
200, that's about 16 pounds. And losing those 16 pounds improves your health dramatically.

In other words, hoping to weigh what you did in high school will derail your plan before it starts.

"Life changes, and that's not an apology or a cop out. It's a realistic assessment," Foster says. "What else
in your life is the same at 45 as it was at 20?"

4. Find better friends.

It's known as the "socialization effect." Cigarette smokers hang out with other cigarette smokers. Drinkers
hang out with other drinks. And overweight people hang out with other overweight people, says Dr. Robert
Kushner of Chicago.

"What do you do if you're hanging out with a group of people who are overweight?" he asks. You pick a
restaurant. You go out for burgers and a beer. "You're probably not talking about going rollerblading."

We tend to pick up the habits of those we hang out with the most. So find some friends with healthy
habits, and you'll become healthier yourself.

5. Do a cart check.

You know the MyPlate diagram — the one that shows how your plate should be split into fruits, grains, vegetables and proteins? Your cart should look the same, Blatner says. When you think you're finished
shopping, do a quick eye check to make sure it's filled with about 25% protein, 25% whole grains and 50%
produce.

"Choice is the enemy of weight loss," Blatner says. She recommends planning out two healthy breakfasts,
two healthy lunches, two healthy snacks and two healthy dinners for the week. Buy the ingredients you
need for each and then rotate them throughout the week.

This gives you enough choice that you won't get bored but not enough choice that you're overwhelmed
and end up looking for the nearest vending machine.

6. Do not eat in response to that thing.

You're at the movies. It's your cousin's bachelorette party. Your son is at the top of his graduating class.
It's a ball game — and what's a ball game without a hot dog? If you want to lose weight, avoid eating in
response to "that thing," Foster says.

Plan what you're going to eat at these special — or not so special — occasions so you don't have to rely on
your willpower. And only eat when you're hungry. There will be more food at the next thing.

7. Tell yourself: "I have the right to be thin."

Self-sabotage is a real problem in weight loss, Connolly says. A lot of times his clients say they want
something and then go out of their way to make sure it doesn't happen.

It's not a lack of desire or motivation. "Something holds us back," he says.

We have to learn to validate ourselves, Connolly says, because we'll never get everything we need from
other people. Tell yourself daily that you deserve to be healthy. You deserve to look and feel good. Then
believe it.

8. Set S.M.A.R.T. goals.

If you haven't heard this acronym before, memorize it now. Any goal you set should be specific,
measurable, attainable, realistic and timely, says Eliza Kingsford, psychotherapist and director of clinical
services for Wellspring. If it meets these qualities, you'll be much more likely to achieve it.

For instance, "I'm going to be more active" is a goal. "I will walk for 30 minutes every day for the next
month" is a S.M.A.R.T. goal.

It's specific in that you know how much activity you're going to do. It's measurable — did you walk today or
not?

It's attainable and realistic; everyone can find 30 minutes in their day, and walking doesn't require a lot of
equipment or special training. And it's timely because you'll be able to see at the end of the month if you
hit your goal.

9. Stand up.

Most of us now spend eight hours a day sitting at our desks at work, and two to three hours sitting at
home. That kind of sedentary lifestyle is nearly impossible to counteract, Dr. Holly Lofton of New York
says, even if you hit the gym for two hours a day (and who does that?).

She suggests wearing a step counter that will keep you aware of the movement — or lack of movement —
you're making throughout the day. Try standing up at your desk while on a conference call, or walking to a
colleague's desk instead of e-mailing him. Take the stairs. Park farther away. Everything counts!

10. Life will never be stress-free. Learn to cope.

Scientists disagree about whether stress itself produces a physical change in your body that can lead to
significant weight gain. But we all know the effect a stressful day can have on our willpower.

The problem, Kushner says, is that there never will be a long period in your life without stress. And if we
cope with everyday stress by indulging in brownies and vodka, the weight will continue to pile on.

"Life happens. It's not so much stress that causes weight gain, it's the coping, the push back," he says.

The key is to learn positive coping skills. If work is stressing you out, take a 10-minute walk instead of
hitting up the cookie tray in the breakroom. Take a yoga class at the end of a long week. Use deep
breaths to get through a phone call with your mother.

And treat yourself to a stress-less day. 

http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/04/health/easy-weight-loss-tips/index.html?hpt=he_t3

BBGC Raises This Much For Walk From Obesity

#YWM2013 Photoshow


 

BBGC Raises This Much For Walk From Obesity

Again, Because We Can.

 

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Save. The. Date.

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Via OAC –
"The OAC thanks all those who attended and participated in YWM2013, making it an incredibly successful and motivating event. We extend our gratitude to this year's sponsors, exhibitors, speakers and all those who helped make the Convention possible. We are proud to announce the 2014 date and location and hope that you will mark your calendars to join us for YWM2014!"
  • September 25 – 28, 2014 - Orlando, Florida
Watch for my next posts for photos, recaps, and more.  Because.
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."  - Margaret Mead