My daughter’s pre-op update

In her own words from her post with typos!  

(I will add my experiences of these processes as the Parent-Of-Patients soon. I HAVE SOME THINGS TO SAY.  It’s very hard to find time to write like I used to— I have been waiting for my smallest child to settle down and not find him on a ceiling fan.  This is being posted from the bathroom, with him.)

Anyway — her quick post from yesterday —

Update:

   About four months ago I made a huge decision that is going impact the rest of my life; I started to take part in the WLS program at Boston Children’s Hospital, which most of you know. In the beginning I had barely any idea of how any of this worked and if I would even be able to lose anything. What I didn’t know was the motivation that comes with having to meet with people, and having to have lost weight before the next monthly appointment to be able to stay/ move forward in the program. 

     At my first appointment with OWL (Optimal Weight loss for Life) which is the first step in the WLS program, I was really unsure how successful I would be in the month to come while she was explaining it. But, I went to my second appointment and I had lost 13lbs which was a HUGE accomplishment for me. After this appointment I was not only shocked at what I had done it motivated me to do more for my next appointment; at the third and final appointment with OWL I had lost 5lbs which is less than the first but still an accomplishment that I was content with, although I could have done more.

        Last month I had my first meeting with the WLS program; this is when it really set in that this was going to happen. At this appointment I met the team of doctors that I am going to be working with through out the next 6 months (if all goes as planned) this team includes a dietitian, social worker, Nurse Practitioner, Psychologist, and of course Surgeon. This first appointment with them went very well they approved me for the program and gave me goals and a cool binder that has all of the foods and drinks I should be eating and what I have to do to be able to do the surgery in the time frame that I would like to; all of this was to set me up for the month until my next appointment. At my next appointment I was unsure of how I did, I hadn’t weighed myself, I honestly thought I had gained; But I didn’t I lost 12lbs which really boosted my motivation and confidence levels because now I have lost a total of 30lbs which is absolutely crazy! I am currently waiting for my next appointment at the end of March where I am hoping to do even better than last time. I am very excited to see where the next few months take me and see what the progress is like so I can reach my end goal in the WLS program!

Honey Boo Boo Weight Intervention

Sometimes there are no words, yet there are so. many. words.  It's hard to choose them.

Why is this a story? Why is it relevant?

Regardless of your feelings of Mama June's "parenting" for what it is — or isn't — (or why it is vastly different than yours or what you grew up with) this child is quite typical of an American Child.

Maybe she's an American Child times twenty plus some considering her life has been under a media microscope since she was very small, and she has been brought up to act for the cameras.  What we see of this kid is so many of the things in our own children that are enhanced because cameras-in-her-face-act-more-goofy-we're-getting-paid for this.

And I know it makes you uncomfortable.  (I know it does.  That is why you watch it, or that is why you must comment about NOT watching because "That Poor Girl, Bless Her Heart!"  Shut up.)

Don't pretend she isn't realistic — kids with overweight and obesity are quite the norm.  Even those with somewhat healthy, active lifestyles. 

I used to get comments about my youngest … "She's just like Honey Boo-Boo."  I never really knew if those who said it meant that she was overweight, or hyperactive.  Because all of my kids are diagnosed overweight or obese

But I am not Mama June.

We do not eat like the Mama June household.    But, that said, overweight still occurs.  

I'd ask you to ask my youngest what her favorite food is.

It's gluten free organic vegan burritos.  Thank-you.  They are expensive, so if you'd like to send a case? PLEASE DO.  I think they're on my Amazon Wish List.  LMAO. 

But why is it that her childhood obesity is a "problem" for us and requires an intervention a la The Doctors?  Because the public consumed her lifestyle and promoted it by reality television?  This child's weight is not our business.  

A lot of it is probably our fault for promoting and exploiting it.  

Stop pushing reality television.  

Rewind The Future Video Campaign – Blame away the obesity!

An anti-obesity commercial from Strong4Life blames parents, for our children's obesity with a side of french fries and a dose of electronic gadgets.

Is this where I thank my parents?  Uh, no.

The video (now viral!) presents a thirtysomething man (I am 35) whom played video games and ate lots of fast-food start with snapped-Mcdonald's fries from Momma.  

I did not.  I got super morbidly obese anyway.  TAKE THAT STRONG4LIFE.

Marketers and anti-obesity advocates — LISTEN:  IT IS NOT THAT SIMPLE.  Obesity is a multifaceted disease and we cannot simply lay blame on someone's mom and dad (or Mcdonald's!) and hope that that is going to fix the problem.  You cannot blame – shame away a disease, it only makes this one BIGGER.

About Strong4Life —

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta launched Strong4Life, a wellness movement designed to ignite societal change and reverse the epidemic of childhood obesity and its associated diseases in Georgia. 

Based on our clinical behavior change model for treating overweight and obese children, Strong4Life aims to help families achieve sustainable lifestyle change by breaking down the complex issue of childhood obesity into simple steps. 

Strong4Life reaches families through public awareness, policy change efforts, school programs, healthcare provider programs, community partnerships and more. 

Strong4Life makes improving family nutrition and physical activity habits fun and provides parents and caregivers the support they need to accomplish their goals.

Screen Shot 2013-10-30 at 7.50.05 AM

Fat Letter on Halloween night – No Candy For You, Kid! Added video with interview –

A woman, Cheryl, in Fargo, North Dakota has decided to take Childhood Obesity into her own hands on Halloween, and pass out this letter —  What?!  

Yo, lady –  it's not our business.

Pass out toys.  Shut off your lights.  This letter makes you a tool.    Then again, I think this whole thing is a prank for radio station PR now that I have had a day to look at it.

Screen Shot 2013-10-30 at 7.50.05 AM


Valley News Live – KVLY/KXJB – Fargo/Grand Forks

Study: Obesity Surgery In Younger Patients Could Reverse Cardiac Problems

“What we found was that the cardiac structure and function in these extremely obese adolescents scheduled for bariatric surgery was much more impaired than one might have thought,” said John Bauer, PhD with Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

The hearts and function of super-morbidly obese adolescents before undergoing bariatric surgery — were that of middle-aged persons. 

After bariatric surgery — the teens' hearts underwent change — reverting to a healthier state.

GOOD NEWS.

Harsh Physical Punishment in Childhood and Adult Physical Health

Is physical punishment in childhood linked to obesity?  (I hear you screaming YES!)  

http://www.drsharma.ca/physical-punishment-and-obesity.html

Study –

Harsh Physical Punishment in Childhood and Adult Physical Health.

BACKGROUND:  The use of physical punishment is controversial. No studies have comprehensively examined the relationship between physical punishment and several physical health conditions in a nationally representative sample. The current study investigated possible associations between harsh physical punishment (ie, pushing, grabbing, shoving, slapping, and hitting) in the absence of more severe child maltreatment (ie, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, emotional neglect, and exposure to intimate partner violence) and several physical health conditions.

METHODS:  Data were from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions collected in 2004 and 2005 (n = 34 226 in the current analysis). The survey was conducted with a representative US adult population sample (20 years or older). Eight past year physical health condition categories were assessed. Models were adjusted for sociodemographic variables, family history of dysfunction, and Axis I and II mental disorders.

RESULTS:  Harsh physical punishment was associated with higher odds of cardiovascular disease (borderline significance), arthritis, and obesity after adjusting for sociodemographic variables, family history of dysfunction, and Axis I and II mental disorders (adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.20 to 1.30).

CONCLUSIONS:  Harsh physical punishment in the absence of child maltreatment is associated with some physical health conditions in a general population sample. These findings inform the ongoing debate around the use of physical punishment and provide evidence that harsh physical punishment independent of child maltreatment is associated with a higher likelihood of physical health conditions.

OAC Calls on Boy Scouts of American To Revise BMI Criteria for Jamboree

OBESITY ACTION COALITION CALLS ON BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA (BSA) TO REVISE THE BSA’S BODY MASS INDEX CRITERIA FOR PARTICIPATION IN 2013 BSA JAMBOREE

Tampa, Fla. – The Obesity Action Coalition (OAC) is calling on the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) to revise its body mass index (BMI) criteria for participating in the BSA 2013 National Jamboree. Currently, the BSA’s policy excludes scouts with a BMI of 40 or higher from participating in the national jamboree.