What does 2000 calories look like!?

I might be slightly disturbed by this, and it is blatantly obvious why I was 320 lbs, and even more clear How Easy It Is To Regain Weight After Bariatric Surgery.

Just a few calories a day – it adds up so damned fast.

My before-WLS diet would easily dwarf this 2000-calorie business.  

Related articles

Digestive_enzymes

Trigger warning – Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy – Sucking vomit out of a tube for weight loss.

"Losing weight shouldn’t take the fun out of life – dinners out with friends, a glass of wine with dinner, or a home-cooked meal with your family. With the AspireAssist, there are no burdensome restrictions on what and when you can eat and drink. Continue to eat the foods you love – and as you start to lose weight, gradually learn how to make healthy choices to match your leaner, healthier body!"

With the Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy System, you can STILL EAT the foods you crave!  Want that half-gallon of ice cream?  Feel free to dig in!

Nom those noms!

Just twenty minutes after your meal — you can discreetly withdraw a portion (OF VOMIT) of your partially digested meal THROUGH YOUR ABDOMEN and dispose of it without the hassle of you know:  lower digestion,  fecal production and weight gain!


Digestive_enzymes

I thought this was an article from The Onion.

It's not.  It's for real.

Jezebel

Dean Kamen, the inventor of the Segway, a machine that exists to stop people from walking, has teamed up with Aspire Bariatrics (that name — shudder) to apply for a patent on a pump that will suck food and beverage straight out of your stomach and rids it from your intestines/life.

Please hold me again.  I'm a Bariatric Patient that is FUCKING TERRIFIED by the thought of giving people the opportunity for controlled bulimia.  I am still wary that this can't be for real –

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The Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy System works by reducing the calories absorbed by the body. After eating, food travels to the stomach immediately, where it is temporarily stored and the digestion process begins. Over the first hour after a meal, the stomach begins breaking down the food, and then passes the food on to the intestines, where calories are absorbed. The AspireAssist allows patients to remove about 30% of the food from the stomach before the calories are absorbed into the body, causing weight loss.

To begin Aspiration Therapy, a specially designed tube, known as the A-Tube™, is placed in the stomach. The A-Tube is a thin silicone rubber tube that connects the inside of the stomach directly to a discreet, poker-chip sized Skin-Port on the outside of the abdomen. The Skin-Port has a valve that can be opened or closed to control the flow of stomach contents. The patient empties a portion of stomach contents after each meal through this tube by connecting a small, handheld device to the Skin-Port. The emptying process is called “aspiration”.

The aspiration process is performed about 20 minutes after the entire meal is consumed and takes 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Because aspiration only removes a third of the food, the body still receives the calories it needs to function. For optimal weight loss, patients should aspirate after each major meal (about 3 times per day)  GAHHHH!!!!!!!!!!! initially. Over time, as patients learn to eat more healthfully, they can reduce the frequency of aspirations.
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Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs – cue thud and human puddling.

I found this list  of the "Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs 2012" through a blog I found via fitbloggin' this year.  This. list. is. amazing.  I'll share half – you can visit the link for the rest

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1. Life with Cake – Greta Gleissner is a psychotherapist specializing in the treatment of eating disorders. Life with Cake is a personal blog about her recovery from an eating disorder and includes advice about addressing urges to eat emotionally.

2.  Karen C.L. Anderson – Karen C.L. Anderson writes about what happens after achieving “weight-loss success”. She talks about self-acceptance, how to truly feel your feelings, and eating mindfully.

3. The Begin Within Blog – The Begin Within Blog is a blog for individuals recovering from eating disorders. The blog covers a wide range of topics from binge eating to intuitive eating to kindness and compassion.

4. Savor the Blog – Savor the Blog expands on the themes found in Savor, the popular book by Thich Nhat Hanh and Dr. Lilian Cheung. Many of the posts are about mindful eating, while others address the emotional reasons we make our food choices.

5. A Weigh Out – A Weigh Out is a blog written by a number of contributors — all of them professionals in the field of nutrition, emotional eating, and eating disorder therapy. While some of the posts are personal reflections by the coaches and therapists, a number of the posts include advice about addressing emotions in our lives that can affect health — and diet.

I can do it

30 Days

meltingmama has logged in for 30 days in a row!

That's a miracle.

I never follow through with a food journal  (we know this through past history) thirty days is a big freaking deal.

As much as I bitch, moan and complain about it, food journaling works.  

Journaling shows me immediately where the concern areas are — and Where I Am Screwing Up.  It's glaringly, painfully obvious what needs to change and why I don't lose weight when I think I should.  Because I am Too Busy Grazing Bites Of Crackers – Cheese – Cheese – and How About That Cheese?  As soon as I make myself accountable to writing it down, at least 75-95% of the time – I do it so much better.  

I screw up constantly. 

I break rules.

I am a huge mess.

But. 

I can do this.

I can do it
I have gone from 182 lbs to 165 lbs since my last OMGFREAKOUT weigh in.  It can work.  I'm not dieting.  I'm not really trying.  I am just checking in everyday and writing down my intake.

Join me if you want?

Shocked Comic Face

Stress triggers eating problems – WHATSTRESS?!?!??!?!?!?


Shocked Comic Face
Huffington Post - 

While the holidays typically come with a great deal of celebration and joy, they can also bring up feelings of loss, regret or depression. And that's the problem: no matter the emotional response, an emotional eater will often turn back to food.

"Many people use eating as a way to cope with difficult emotions, not only bad ones, but also happiness, excitement and celebration, for example," says Alexis Cona, a clinical psychologist in private practice and a researcher at New York Obesity Research Center.

Researchers believe that many emotional eaters turn to food to numb emotions that are too painful or difficult to process. As Cona explains, it can be a mindless cycle in which an emotional eater suddenly finds himself in front of the fridge, not quite knowing how he got there.

Family time during the holidays can be a particular challenge, as many disordered eating habits begin with poor boundaries between family members, Cona says. Preparing oneself for difficult and triggering interactions might be an important aspect of getting ready for the holidays.

What's more, during this season, food is more plentiful. Many people have favorite, traditional treats that they only eat during this time of year.

"There are all sorts of memories associated with family favorites — these foods are imbued with expectations," says Ellen Shuman, president of the Binge Eating Disorder Association and an emotional and binge eating recovery coach. "That feeling of deprivation can make an emotional eater feel like they have to eat their fill in that moment. They become forbidden foods — and that brings out the rebel in many emotional eaters."

Instead, Shuman counsels patients not to have once-a-year foods. If they love a certain dish, they should make it occasionally all year long to avoid that panicked feeling of scarcity.

So what's someone with a history of stress-based eating to do as the holidays loom large?

First of all, work on mindfulness. Cona asks her patients to check in with themselves before they eat anything. Do you feel physiologically hungry? Rate your hunger on a scale. And if you aren't actually hungry, but you want to eat, think about what you might be feeling and what underlying desire is at the bottom of the impulse to eat.

Cona also recommends practicing kindness to oneself, especially in the aftermath of an overindulgence. "Trying to find acceptance can be challenging, especially in a society that condemns us for having eaten this way; especially if our bodies don't look the way society says they should. But it's important not beat ourselves up over it. If this happens, try to learn from it. Don't shame yourself."

But Shuman adds, you may not be the only person you need to forgive. Letting go of painful family history could help prevent the emotional eater's cycle. "Keep in mind that you don't have to spend the holidays with your history with Mom — just with Mom in that moment."

 

Saltines

Weight gain – calories – two crackers a day!

"The newest insanity to hit the weight loss circuit.. 1-2lbs a yr or up to 10lbs in 5 yrs if you….. Lick the peanut butter off the spoon daily, eat 2 crackers daily, lick your fingers when eating chips…. INSANITY"

Saltines

I know exactly what this  blogger is referring to – I attended and recorded the event where the discussion took place.  

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Atkins Frozen Meals in WalMart

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Hey, Atkins?  How did I not know about THESE?

Please to HAVE THEM IN MY WALMART, yesterday.  Or delivery?   Yes please?

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I. live. on. frozen. meals.  

I am entirely serious:  

I purchase 2-3 meals for consumption 5-7 days a week, I am for about a 1200-1400 calorie intake.  I am not supposed to cook, unsupervised. <—- the link explains.

I am your target customer.  I spend days looking for lower-carb options.

NOW.

Thanks!  *skips away*

Holiday-weight-gain

Do you GAIN weight during the holidays?

It is a common idea that people gain weight during the holiday season, and a typical excuse for doing so.

Holiday-weight-gain
What kind of things do you tell yourself?

"I am expected to eat this fudge, cake, pie, grandmas-cookies, holiday-fare, what-have-you, so it's not MY fault that I gain 5-10-15 pounds this holiday season."  (Lies.)

"Everyone WANTS my special holiday candy that I make every year.  I have to make it."  (Bull.)

"I HAVE to cook the pies, holiday breads, sugar cookies, church pot luck foods, party foods, etc, so you can't blame me for gaining."  (LIIIIIES.)

"This candy is only available during this season, I have to buy it and eat it now, or I won't get it."  (Get. OVER. It.)

First thing I need to tell you?  Your pies?  Kind of suck.  Nobody really likes them.  We eat them because you make them, and don't want to make you feel bad because they were left untouched.  Nobody really likes the pies anyway. 

Turns out, that unless you really go overboard — the caloric damage done in the holiday season is about a pound.

Oh.  Not. a. big. deal. at. all.  So why are we making up so many justifications for excess in the season of excess?  Just… because we can?

I guess that might be good enough reason for some.

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I am not willing to take on a liquid diet, diet pills, snort energy powder, or spend hour upon hour in the gym on January 1st to rationalize my baklava habit or 96 ounce bag of M + M's for the next four weeks.   (Which, by the way, isn't happening.)

Thanks, but no thanks.  I had weight loss surgery to AVOID fad diets, crash diets and beyond.

I can handle a pound of weight gain.  I can do that in two hours.  I have bowels of steel.  RAWR.

Washington Post

A classic study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, despite some pretty big claims about weight gain, the average American gains less than a pound during the holiday season. 

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health had seen claims on the news that the average American would gain somewhere between eight and 10 pounds during the holidays. Studies that rely on self-reporting find Americans estimating they gain five pounds during the time period.

The researchers decided to investigate, recruiting 200 people between ages 19 and 82. The sample was representative of the United States in terms of the prevalence of overweight and obese individuals. 

The individuals came in to be weighed in September or October, and then again in February or March. The reserachers found that, on average, the participants gained .37 kilograms, or 0.81 pounds. 

“The subjects believed they had gained four times as much weight as their actual holiday weight gain of 0.37 kg,” the researchers conclude. “Fewer than 10 percent of subjects gained 2.3 kg or more, and more than half of all measurements of weight after the initial one were within 1 kg of the previous measurement.”

N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 23;342(12):861-7.

A prospective study of holiday weight gain.

BACKGROUND:

It is commonly asserted that the average American gains 5 lb (2.3 kg) or more over the holiday period between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day, yet few data support this statement.

METHODS:

To estimate actual holiday-related weight variation, we measured body weight in a convenience sample of 195 adults. The subjects were weighed four times at intervals of six to eight weeks, so that weight change was determined for three periods: preholiday (from late September or early October to mid-November), holiday (from mid-November to early or mid-January), and postholiday (from early or mid-January to late February or early March). A final measurement of body weight was obtained in 165 subjects the following September or October. Data on other vital signs and self-reported health measures were obtained from the patients in order to mask the main outcome of interest.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/-SD) weight increased significantly during the holiday period (gain, 0.37+/-1.52 kg; P<0.001), but not during the preholiday period (gain, 0.18+/-1.49 kg; P=0.09) or the postholiday period (loss, 0.07+/-1.14 kg; P=0.36). As compared with their weight in late September or early October, the study subjects had an average net weight gain of 0.48+/-2.22 kg in late February or March (P=0.003). Between February or March and the next September or early October, there was no significant additional change in weight (gain, 0.21 kg+/-2.3 kg; P=0.13) for the 165 participants who returned for follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

The average holiday weight gain is less than commonly asserted. Since this gain is not reversed during the spring or summer months, the net 0.48-kg weight gain in the fall and winter probably contributes to the increase in body weight that frequently occurs during adulthood.

 





Visit Netrition.com
for a wide selection of nutritional supplements, weightloss, bodybuilding and low carbohydrate items.

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Eat-Rite False food-label information

New York News | NYC Breaking News

According to the labels, they're incredibly low in carbohydrates, calories, and fat. They don't taste like diet food.

THIS MAKES ME FUME.

Lisa Lillian, known as Hungry Girl has her own show on the Food Network, writes cookbooks, and a daily email devoted to guilt-free eating.  She heard from a lot of people that they were suspicious of this pizza.

We took the pizza and some other Eat-Rite products to a certified laboratory and had them tested. The tests found the Chicago Deep Dish Pizza Uno, which the label claims is 210 Calories really has 583 calories. The claim of 6 grams of fat is also bogus. Tests found 29 grams of fat.  Instead of 7 grams of carbohydrates, there are 53 grams.  We also tested Eat-Rite's Pizza Duo and got almost identical results, 577 calories, 28 grams of fat, and 53 grams of carbohydrates.

It's not just the pizza. Eat-Rite's Chic-Wich Sandwich, which the label says has 220 calories, 4 grams of fat, actually has almost double the calories and five times as much fat. The same goes for the Crusty Baked Mac-Cheese, 465 calories, and 23 grams of fat. We contacted Eat-Rite in Clear Lake California three times, and sent them copies of our test results.

We asked to see any proof they have for the claims on their labels, but the company has not responded.

Read more: http://www.myfoxny.com/story/18071984/false-nut#ixzz2C72n6NYp

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