When can I resume exercise after weight loss surgery?

ASMBS –  When can I resume exercise after my WLS?

Postoperative exercise

Exercise after surgery is absolutely imperative, and it may be the most important factor that can help a patient achieve long-standing and successful weight loss.

Regimen:

  1. Start walking from day 1.
  2. Increase your walking each day. Add other aerobic exercises like swimming and bicycle riding as your surgeon permits and as you feel so inclined.
  3. Start light weight training and sit-ups as your surgeon allows. Increase weights and number of reps gradually. This type of exercise will increase muscles mass which improves strength, increases bone density, and increases metabolism.
  4. Consider using a personal trainer to educate one about exercise, improve motivation, and help assure proper routines.

Independent of what phase a patient may be in before or after surgery, there are certain basic safe and reliable rules to follow in regard to exercise:

  1. 1. Consider your goals and how you want to accomplish them. You can achieve it!
  2. 2. Use exercise in combination with weight loss surgery to maximize results.
  3. 3. Remember everyone starts from a different state of physical ability and strength. Gradually increase your activity and exercise capacity. Mild discomfort from exercise is acceptable, but pain should be avoided. Ignore the cliché, “No pain no gain.”
  4. 4. Drink plenty of water before, during, and after exercise.

In addition to loss of fat mass, there are other numerous benefits to exercise. These benefits include prevention of loss of muscle mass when losing weight rapidly after surgery, and improved overall weight loss. One’s immune system is enhanced by exercise and this will help maintain overall general health. Exercise may also reduce a person’s appetite. Fatigue, which sometimes is problematic after surgery, may be reduced. Finally, there can be improved balance, improved self-confidence, and overall improved sense of well being.

http://asmbs.org/2012/01/bariatric-surgery-postoperative-concerns/#sthash.88t8iomM.dpuf

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Hello maintenance or the no-stress apathetic no-diet plan for long term WLS patients.

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I suppose this is maintenance.
I’ll take it.  I apparently maintain at this caloric intake at this activity level.
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It’s magic. 


I have also been extraordinarily “lazy”  (in Beth terms) in the last 30 days — with very little gym time. Calorie Control.org doesn’t have a setting for extraordinarily lazy – but if they did – or a setting for extraordinarily lazy post bariatric patient who eats 1200-1400 calories per day, that would be me.
PS.  I’m not really that lazy, but, I am not about to own running half-marathons up in this bitch, because, no.
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I suspect that as soon as I get back into a routine at the gym (… school is out and it’s hot and we are whiny)  that one or two things will happen:
I will see a bounce up because “YAY! MUSCLE!”  Or my trend down will start again – although as it has been – very slowly.  I still have body-fat to lose while I grow/gain muscle which I desperately need.   Either option is fine with me.  I have no goal, other than health with no stress in doing so.
Welcome to the apathetic non-diet plan for WLS’ers.  
It works.  

Reebok Crossfit Nano 2.0 Sneaker from fitbloggin!

I got Reebok sneaker swag at fitbloggin from (…again!) this year!  (Last year my kid stole the shoes from me and I never got a shot to share them with you.  You don't want the review now.  She's um, made them special.)

This year – they are all. mine.  Muhahahaha.

Reebok Crossfit Nano
Behold the Reebok CrossFit Nano 2.0!

The new CrossFit Nano 2.0. has an upper designed for lateral support, and a low profile platform that balances cushioning and stability so you can stay quick, safe and comfortable through even the toughest WODs.

  • Breathable mesh upper for added ventilation
  • Low-cut for added mobility
  • DuraGrip print along the toe cap makes it durable for longer use
  • High abrasion rubber outsole for improved durability
  • Upper designed for lateral support and stability
  • Full length low profile with EVA midsole for cushioning and low-to-ground soccer feel
  • Forefoot flex grooves for added flexibility

I will wear them to the gym tonight and check-back with a review immediately!

Thank you Reebok and fitbloggin!

 

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Apathy and failure

Recently when I saw a fresh weight loss and posted it, I was confronted with a commenter who asked me why I posted my body-weight.  It is a fair question and I do not challenge her asking it, because it's been asked of me many times when I have posted my actual weight-as-a-number.


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I will say that number-sharing is the norm (…or was?) in the weight loss surgery/bariatric community as a whole for as long as I have been a part of it — and that is at least 10-12 years that I have actively read and participated in emails, groups and chats.  I posted the question as a poll this morning on Facebook as well.  Go answer!  Come back.


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Back in the hey-day of message boards we would add a line of text to our signatures (..siggies!) to signify our –

  • HW (Highest Weight)
  • SW (Start Weight or Surgery Weight)
  • CW (Current Weight)
  • GW (Goal Weight)

They would look alot like this!

Beth 

HW – 320  SW – 298  CW – 151 – GW – 150

Don't judge the comic-sans.  

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I would go back to *my old posts circa 2003/2004 and show you, except I was banned from my message board back then, and my posts via BethLButterfly disappeared.  She posted in Comic Sans at times. Her demise is why MM exists.

Number or weight sharing is.  Was.  Always will be?  I would say that in general — most individuals that have bariatric surgery are often proud of every single pound lost, and want to wear their "pounds lost" as a badge of honor.  Some post ops are extraordinarily proud and not only wear the pounds lost, current weight, but will add things like "LBS GONE FOREVER!"  

Losing weight is no easy feat, and after bariatric surgery — it feels like victory. Why wouldn't someone want to own it — even just for a while?  I suppose when you've been 500, 400, 300, 250 lbs — wearing a newly slimmed down self is quite a change and being able to put that number out there to the universe — even just for a while is worth it.


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Now, for me.  This commenter wondered if my posting about my actual number was an obsession – let me clear it up here.  No.  I've always weighed myself.  


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Bariatric surgery and the life afterwards is ALL ABOUT NUMBERS.  Losing pounds, inches, and sometimes counting calories, measuring food, and exercise.  If you're a pre-op that doesn't want to 'hear that' – I am sorry – but it really, truly, is.

I absolutely understand that some people take these numbers to an extreme – and extremes are unhealthy at any level — and that is how we get into situations like: needing bariatric surgery.  Extreme caloric intake is unhealthy, an extreme sedentary lifestyle is unhealthy.  We require balance.  

It takes a very long time for some people to learn this:  example —->  ME.

While I have always "weighed-in,"  I am also The Queen Of Avoidance, and as soon as I see the scale move up – I remove the scale.  (That's magic, if I can't see my regain, no one else can.  That is, until I SEE THE PHOTO EVIDENCE MYSELF AND SCREAM.  *See below.)  


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So what has changed?  I removed myself from the effects of negative influences — changed my views on some things and … GASP …

I added ACCOUNTABILITY to my daily life.  I now weigh myself near-daily, or at LEAST weekly.  I check-in my food nearly every single day on a journal.  

Is that obsessive?  No.  Why?  Because before — not paying attention led to weight regain.  Surrounding myself by people with negative and apathetic views on life – brought me down.

Apathy causes failure.  


Instant_apathy

Yes, I am fully aware I am a Bariatric Bad Girl – but maybe now you understand – BAD DOES NOT EQUATE "BAD," or breaking rules, or doing things WRONG.  

It's BAD-ASS.  (Help us help, BTW.)

*June 2012 – April 2013


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But, recently I started paying attention – and seeing results:


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My brain likes to see results, black and white, literal, on paper, in lines, to show me that if I DO X – Y WILL HAPPEN.


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Because it works.  (Shut up Weight Watchers.)  And my little brain likes proof.   


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If I can see tangible results I will keep going – I will keep doing a thing if I can see a result.  I do not like to work for "free – " you see.  Does that make sense?  Here's an example, a very simple one.  I started going to the gym and doing basic exercise (…long walks on the treadmill and seated elliptical) about a month ago (…I'll check back in my Facebook check ins) and I noticed a tangible result the night before last.  My leg muscles are coming back.  This is enough to create a positive reaction to keep me motivated.  

It's not about obsessing about a number.  I don't have a goal.  

Octane xR6 Series Recumbent Elliptical Machine

Dear Octane People, Thanks for making this. This product works for me.  I am able to use this pretty effortlessly after using the treadmill for an hour — and I am NOT complaining yet.  

<3, The new girl at the gym with excess skin who does not enjoy flopping it all around.

427 lbs to TRIATHLETE!

"There's a group of us out there who have had weight loss surgery who are athletes now. I never felt comfortable saying that," said Smith.
But her coach at SBR Coaching in Verona has called her that for a long time."I've never worked with anybody quite like Aimee. She started her journey by losing the weight and not knowing quite what to do only that she thought she was going to die and she needed to do something," said the coach.

Leading an Active Lifestyle in a Sedentary World: Your Weight Matters 2012 National Convention

Leading an Active Lifestyle in a Sedentary World: Your Weight Matters 2012 National Convention

This session was led by Tim Church, MD, MPH, PhD

Tim Church, M.D., M.P.H, Ph.D., is Professor of Preventative Medicine at Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University. He has authored over 100 research articles, received numerous awards for preventative health research and co-authored, “Move Yourself, The Cooper Clinic Medical Director’s Guide to All Healing Benefits of Exercise.” Frequently used as an expert source for health stories with national media outlets, Dr. Church interviews with NBC, USA Today, Reuters, Wall Street Journal and CNN. He earned his Medical Degree at Tulane University School of Medicine and is the former Vice President of Medical Research at The Cooper Institute.

Let’s go. #motivation

Hello, treadmill song.  Or chair dance.  Make it happen.  /repeat
Let’s go!
Make no excuses now
I’m talking here and now
I’m talking here and now

Let’s go!
Your time is running out
I’m talking here and now
I’m talking here and now

It’s not about what you’ve done
It’s about what you doing
It’s all about where you going
No matter where you’ve been
Let’s go!

There ain’t no better time
I’m talking here and now
I’m talking here and now

Let’s go!
Right now is where you shine
I’m talking here and now
I’m talking here and now

It’s not about what you’ve done
It’s about what you doing
It’s all about where you going
No matter where you’ve been
Let’s go!