Holiday-weight-gain

Do you GAIN weight during the holidays?

It is a common idea that people gain weight during the holiday season, and a typical excuse for doing so.

Holiday-weight-gain
What kind of things do you tell yourself?

"I am expected to eat this fudge, cake, pie, grandmas-cookies, holiday-fare, what-have-you, so it's not MY fault that I gain 5-10-15 pounds this holiday season."  (Lies.)

"Everyone WANTS my special holiday candy that I make every year.  I have to make it."  (Bull.)

"I HAVE to cook the pies, holiday breads, sugar cookies, church pot luck foods, party foods, etc, so you can't blame me for gaining."  (LIIIIIES.)

"This candy is only available during this season, I have to buy it and eat it now, or I won't get it."  (Get. OVER. It.)

First thing I need to tell you?  Your pies?  Kind of suck.  Nobody really likes them.  We eat them because you make them, and don't want to make you feel bad because they were left untouched.  Nobody really likes the pies anyway. 

Turns out, that unless you really go overboard — the caloric damage done in the holiday season is about a pound.

Oh.  Not. a. big. deal. at. all.  So why are we making up so many justifications for excess in the season of excess?  Just… because we can?

I guess that might be good enough reason for some.

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I am not willing to take on a liquid diet, diet pills, snort energy powder, or spend hour upon hour in the gym on January 1st to rationalize my baklava habit or 96 ounce bag of M + M's for the next four weeks.   (Which, by the way, isn't happening.)

Thanks, but no thanks.  I had weight loss surgery to AVOID fad diets, crash diets and beyond.

I can handle a pound of weight gain.  I can do that in two hours.  I have bowels of steel.  RAWR.

Washington Post

A classic study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, despite some pretty big claims about weight gain, the average American gains less than a pound during the holiday season. 

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health had seen claims on the news that the average American would gain somewhere between eight and 10 pounds during the holidays. Studies that rely on self-reporting find Americans estimating they gain five pounds during the time period.

The researchers decided to investigate, recruiting 200 people between ages 19 and 82. The sample was representative of the United States in terms of the prevalence of overweight and obese individuals. 

The individuals came in to be weighed in September or October, and then again in February or March. The reserachers found that, on average, the participants gained .37 kilograms, or 0.81 pounds. 

“The subjects believed they had gained four times as much weight as their actual holiday weight gain of 0.37 kg,” the researchers conclude. “Fewer than 10 percent of subjects gained 2.3 kg or more, and more than half of all measurements of weight after the initial one were within 1 kg of the previous measurement.”

N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 23;342(12):861-7.

A prospective study of holiday weight gain.

BACKGROUND:

It is commonly asserted that the average American gains 5 lb (2.3 kg) or more over the holiday period between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day, yet few data support this statement.

METHODS:

To estimate actual holiday-related weight variation, we measured body weight in a convenience sample of 195 adults. The subjects were weighed four times at intervals of six to eight weeks, so that weight change was determined for three periods: preholiday (from late September or early October to mid-November), holiday (from mid-November to early or mid-January), and postholiday (from early or mid-January to late February or early March). A final measurement of body weight was obtained in 165 subjects the following September or October. Data on other vital signs and self-reported health measures were obtained from the patients in order to mask the main outcome of interest.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/-SD) weight increased significantly during the holiday period (gain, 0.37+/-1.52 kg; P<0.001), but not during the preholiday period (gain, 0.18+/-1.49 kg; P=0.09) or the postholiday period (loss, 0.07+/-1.14 kg; P=0.36). As compared with their weight in late September or early October, the study subjects had an average net weight gain of 0.48+/-2.22 kg in late February or March (P=0.003). Between February or March and the next September or early October, there was no significant additional change in weight (gain, 0.21 kg+/-2.3 kg; P=0.13) for the 165 participants who returned for follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

The average holiday weight gain is less than commonly asserted. Since this gain is not reversed during the spring or summer months, the net 0.48-kg weight gain in the fall and winter probably contributes to the increase in body weight that frequently occurs during adulthood.

 





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Oh. Yes. She. Did.

Hold the Press Releases, Suz!  


How do you go from not paying your taxes, failure to ship orders since 2011, closing your store, foreclosure, shutting down all communication to… THIS?

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Can sugar make you stupid? Studies point to yes.

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Can sugar make you stupid?  

Oh dear.   

If the following study regarding the ingestion of sugar and cognition is true — I should be gaining brains instead of losing them — considering that I eat about 95% less of the sweet stuff since I had roux en y gastric bypass surgery.  

However as we all know, *MY brains are very special since I had weight loss surgery.   

The combination of a high-sugar intake and a lack of Omega-3 Fatty Acids caused brain fail in rats!  

What about… us?  What if poor diet causes brain issues that aren't reversible?  This intrigues me.

National Geographic

 Sweet drinks scrambled the memories and stunted learning in lab rats in a new study—leading to "high concern" over what sugary diets may do to people, according to neuroscientist Fernando Gomez-Pinilla. (Read more about memory from National Geographic magazine.)

 For the study, Gomez-Pinilla's team first trained rats to successfully navigate a maze, giving them only water and standard rat chow for five days. During the following six weeks, the rats' water was replaced with syrups that were 15 percent fructose.

"Most sodas people consume are about 12 percent sugar, so imagine if you drank soda with sugar added instead of water," said Gomez-Pinilla, of the University of California, Los Angeles.m


During the six-week period, half the rodents were also given flaxseed oil and fish oil—both rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These antioxidants may protect against damage to chemical connections in the brain called synapses, past research suggests.

After six weeks of the fructose syrup, all the rats were slower at running the maze. However, those that had received omega-3s were slightly faster than their counterparts.

By studying the dissected brains of the study rats, the researchers determined that the high-fructose diets had sabotaged the ability of synapses to change, a key factor in learning. The sugary drinks had also disrupted the sugar-regulating protein insulin in a brain area called the hippocampus, which play a role in memory formation in both rats and humans.t

"I was very shocked to see how strong an effect these diets could have on the brain—I have high concern that the foods people eat can really affect mood and cognition," Gomez-Pinilla said.

Study Abstract

We pursued studies to determine the effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in brain, and the possibilities to modulate these effects by dietary interventions. In addition, we have assessed potential mechanisms by which brain metabolic disorders can impact synaptic plasticity and cognition.

We report that high-dietary fructose consumption leads to increase in insulin resistance index, insulin and triglyceride levels, which characterize MetS. Rats fed on an n-3 deficient diet showed memory deficits in Barnes Maze, which were further exacerbated by fructose intake.

In turn, n-3 deficient diet and fructose interventions disrupted insulin receptor signaling in hippocampus as evidenced by a decrease in phosphorylation of insulin receptor and its downstream effector Akt.

We found that high fructose consumption with n-3 deficient diet disrupts membrane homeostasis as evidenced by an increase in the ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids and levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a marker of lipid peroxidation.

Disturbances in brain energy metabolism due to n-3 deficiency and fructose treatments were evidenced by a significant decrease in AMPK phosphorylation and its upstream modulator LKB1 as well as a decrease in Sir2 levels. The decrease in phosphorylation of CREB, synapsin I and synaptophysin (SYP) levels by n-3 deficiency and fructose shows the impact of metabolic dysfunction on synaptic plasticity. All parameters of metabolic dysfunction related to the fructose treatment were ameliorated by the presence of dietary n-3 fatty acid.

Results showed that dietary n-3 fatty acid deficiency elevates the vulnerability to metabolic dysfunction and impaired cognitive functions by modulating insulin receptor signaling and synaptic plasticity.

 

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Celebrate Bariatric Supplements Calcium Citrate Soft Chews

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Celebrate Bariatric Supplements recently came out with a line of Calcium Citrate Soft Chews, and I have been holding my stash hostage for a very long time for this review.  If you had not noticed, I am a thief.  I steal samples from various supplement companies when I go to conferences.  I fill my pockets with chewy bites, protein bars, and samples of shakes.  I hoard them until I realize it's been Too Long Since I Stole Them And I Should Really Tell Everyone How They Taste Now.