©geballe-sitting

A very powerful self-photography project of weight loss surgery.

Finally.  Something I can post.

©geballe-sitting

"Currently, Samantha's work focuses on conceptual portraiture, allowing her to explore human emotion from the inside out. She is working on an on-going self-portrait series focused on body image and healing that challenges viewers to question what is means to accept oneself. "

©geballe-stomach

 

Her photos are shocking if not absolutely realistic and raw if you have lost hundred(s) of pounds with weight loss surgery

If you have yet to do so, I would not be alarmed.  Question the photos.  Dig into them.  Feel it.  This is is what we know.

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Cropped image. 

Study – Weight-Loss Surgery Linked To Increased Suicide Risk

Another OBVIOUS. 

Reuters –

“These findings suggest that more effort may be needed to improve access to mental health care services in these patients should they need them, and perhaps some screening in the second year and onwards,” Bhatti said. 

During the first three years after surgery, 111 patients received emergency care for self-inflicted injuries, or roughly 1 percent of people in the study. While small, the risk of these emergencies was 54 percent higher after surgery than it was before.

Study – JAMA

Importance  Self-harm behaviors, including suicidal ideation and past suicide attempts, are frequent in bariatric surgery candidates. It is unclear, however, whether these behaviors are mitigated or aggravated by surgery.

Objective  To compare the risk of self-harm behaviors before and after bariatric surgery.

Design, Setting, and Participants  In this population-based, self-matched, longitudinal cohort analysis, we studied 8815 adults from Ontario, Canada, who underwent bariatric surgery between April 1, 2006, and March 31, 2011. Follow-up for each patient was 3 years prior to surgery and 3 years after surgery.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Self-harm emergencies 3 years before and after surgery.

Results  The cohort included 8815 patients of whom 7176 (81.4%) were women, 7063 (80.1%) were 35 years or older, and 8681 (98.5%) were treated with gastric bypass. A total of 111 patients had 158 self-harm emergencies during follow-up. Overall, self-harm emergencies significantly increased after surgery (3.63 per 1000 patient-years) compared with before surgery (2.33 per 1000 patient-years), equaling a rate ratio (RR) of 1.54 (95% CI, 1.03-2.30; P = .007). Self-harm emergencies after surgery were higher than before surgery among patients older than 35 years (RR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.05-2.94; P = .03), those with a low-income status (RR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.20-3.65; P = .01), and those living in rural areas (RR, 6.49; 95% CI, 1.42-29.63; P= .02). The most common self-harm mechanism was an intentional overdose (115 [72.8%]). A total of 147 events (93.0%) occurred in patients diagnosed as having a mental health disorder during the 5 years before the surgery.

Conclusions and Relevance  In this study, the risk of self-harm emergencies increased after bariatric surgery, underscoring the need for screening for suicide risk during follow-up.




Link – http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2448916

Alcohol Sensitizes Brain Response to Food Aromas and Increases Food Intake in Women, Research Shows

Something I feel like we already knew?  Sigh.  Please read.

PR from The Obesity Society –

Alcohol Sensitizes Brain Response to Food Aromas and Increases Food Intake in Women, Research Shows

First study of its kind ties hypothalamus, in addition to the gut, to the aperitif phenomenon

SILVER SPRING, MD – The first study of its kind measuring the brain's role in mediating caloric intake following alcohol consumption among women shows that alcohol exposure sensitizes the brain's response to food aromas and increases caloric intake. The research, led by William J. A. Eiler II, PhD, of the Indiana University School of Medicine's Departments of Medicine and Neurology, adds to the current body of knowledge that alcohol increases food intake, also known as the "aperitif effect," but shows this increased intake does not rely entirely on the oral ingestion of alcohol and its absorption through the gut. The study is published in the July issue of the journal Obesity published by The Obesity Society (TOS).

"The brain, absent contributions from the gut, can play a vital role in regulating food intake. Our study found that alcohol exposure can both increase the brain's sensitivity to external food cues, like aromas, and result in greater food consumption," said Dr. Eiler. "Many alcoholic beverages already include empty calories, and when you combine those calories with the aperitif effect, it can lead to energy imbalance and possibly weight gain."

Researchers conducted the study in 35 non-vegetarian, non-smoking women at a healthy weight. To test the direct effects of alcohol on the brain, researchers circumvented the digestive system by exposing each participant to intravenously administered alcohol at one study visit and then to a placebo (saline) on another study visit, prior to eating. Participants were observed, and brain responses to food and non-food aromas were measured using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response via fMRI scans. After imaging, participants were offered a lunch choice between pasta with Italian meat sauce and beef and noodles. 

When participants received intravenous alcohol, they ate more food at lunch, on average, compared to when they were given the placebo. However, there were individual differences, with one-third of participants eating less after alcohol exposure when compared to the placebo exposure. In addition to changes in consumption, the area of the brain responsible for certain metabolic processes, thehypothalamus, also responded more to food odors, compared to non-food odors, after alcohol infusion vs. saline. The researchers concluded that the hypothalamus may therefore play a role in mediating the impact of alcohol exposure on our sensitivity to food cues, contributing to the aperitif phenomenon.

 "This research helps us to further understand the neural pathways involved in the relationship between food consumption and alcohol," said Martin Binks, PhD, FTOS, TOS Secretary Treasurer and Associate Professor of Nutrition Sciences at Texas Tech University. "Often, the relationship between alcohol on eating is oversimplified; this study unveils a potentially more complex process in need of further study."

Study authors agree and call for further research into the mechanism by which the hypothalamus affects food reward.

"Today, nearly two-thirds of adults in the U.S. consume alcohol, with wine consumption rising, which reinforces the need to better understand how alcohol can contribute to overeating," continued Dr. Binks.

Read the full article in Obesity here.

Permitters and Restrictors.

 

Patients With Psychiatric Illness Require Close Watch After Bariatric Surgery

A study conducted in Brazil and presented at a poster session at the 2014 annual meeting of the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders looked at six cases in which patients committed suicide or attempted suicide after bariatric surgery. The study did not specify the form of weight loss surgery that each patient underwent.

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Video – Vision is Vital: Challenging Falsely Acquired Thoughts

  • Deciphering between the truths of others can cloud our ability to see our own reality.
  • Holding onto the things that weigh us down can create debilitating physical FAT and emotional Falsely Acquired Thoughts (F.A.T.) Change the brain, change the body, and find out how to fight F.A.T. for real. Presented by Merrill Littleberry, LCSW, LCDC, CCM, CI-CPT, a licensed psychotherapist and understands the debilitating effects of emotional and physical weight.

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Your Friends Are Liars: Truth Behind Facebook UPDATES.

EXACTLY.

Via Fast Company – "A new short film called What's On Your Mind? illuminates some of the problems with being hyper-aware of what your friends are up to. Taking its name from the question at the heart of the status update field on Facebook, the film begins with a man comparing the forever-unfurling highlight reel on his computer screen to the comparatively drab confines of a night in with his girlfriend. Everything he sees devalues his reality, eventually driving him to just make some shit up in order to seem less lame–to himself, as well as to anyone who might be paying attention. He is validated in return, with a substantial number of "likes." From here on, the differences between what's actually happening and "what's on your mind?" begin snowballing, in ways that range from subtle lies to wholesale fabrications."

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What do you do when your voice is gone? Plus being a bully makes your health better, no wonder you look so good.

I have many, many faults.  I know this.  

Yesterday I found myself hockey checked off of a social network for a temporary ban.  Gasp!  Shock!  Horror!  You might think I did something awful to deserve the "jailing" but it sometimes works in reverse on social networks.  When a person outs a wrong or blows the whistle — sometimes THAT PERSON — in this case me gets tossed offline for saying the word.  

My theory about this: is that Facebook is so big, so many users, that it's team of eyeballs that look-over-the-things-that-offend-the-people cannot possibly fathom the Things That Offend Each End User Of It's Free Service.  

Even when someone like me — gets a thinly veiled threat or not at all veiled — and I re-post it — I get the boot.

Hell, I could not even follow it.  All I knew is that someone posted they wanted me in the ground – there was a shovel and salt.  AND I DO NOT KNOW WHAT I DID TO DESERVE IT – aside from my last post.  Which is my TRUTH.  MY.  TRUTH. 

Soon, there were two dozen angry rabid post weight loss surgery patients, (some that were former members of my group, some that I did not know) jumping on a hate filled thread on Facebook — name-calling and wanting me in a hole, too.  Why?  I have the thread.  It may or may not still be going.  I don't know.  It is painful to read.  I was called a bitch, a victim, and worse.

Download For beth aka melting mama

And for attempting to stand up for myself, I am the one in the Facebook slammah.  Facebook's popo clearly can't follow the chain of events and regard my actions as the problem.  The persons whom are actually at fault are publicly posting and GLOATING about their success in getting a person bullied offline.

One is accepting cash donations.  Why?  

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So.  Here I am.  In jail.  Eating mush.  Getting violated.

Hey, I suppose I shouldn't knock it too hard, it's free delivered food, free clothes, and a place to sleep, with no kids to bother me – and do I have to pay taxes?  <g>

Might not be a bad idea.  Screw it.

I hope you feel better about yourself today.

2013-06-05-onlinebullying

  • http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2014/05/12/adult-health-better-for-bullies-than-their-victims-study
  • Because inflammation is an underlying factor in so many chronic diseases, the fact that people in their early 20s are already showing signs of inflammation is a warning bell, Copeland adds. Using data from the larger study, his team will scrutinize other measures of adversity, such as the stress hormone cortisol, and epigenetic changes in which environmental factors affect the way genes are activated. The scientists will also look for biomarkers of more positive methods than bullying through which kids can increase their confidence and social standing.
  • This is why SO many bullied kids are FAT.  STOP IT.