No-Light-Beers

25% Drink 16% Calories Via Alcohol Daily.

About 25% of you drink alcohol every day — given the normal non-weight loss surgical population according to a new CDC study.  And about 16% of your daily calories come from alcohol.  

PS.  Give this study to bariatric patients – I would say from my very non-professional standpoint that results would be higher vs. calorie intake given our higher rates of addictions to All The Things.  

That is some scary daily nutrition math.

No-Light-Beers

Cheers.

CDC

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The U.S. population consumes an average of 100 calories a day from alcoholic beverages. Men, 150 calories; women, 53.

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“If you are drinking an extra 150 calories more than you need a day, those extra calories could end up on your waist or your hips,” said Joan Salge Blake, a clinical associate professor in the nutrition program at Boston University and a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Those excess daily calories could cause you to put on a pound monthly and would add up to over 10 pounds in a year,” Blake said.

Specifically for a gastric bypass patient — it can lead to all sorts of damage.  Play in the Google.  

Jesse Jackson, Jr. Resigns – Welcome to our world Mr J.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

 

Huffington Post

"Jackson, 47, disappeared in June, and it was later revealed that he was being treated at the Mayo Clinic for bipolar disorder and gastrointestinal issues. He returned to his Washington home in September but went back to the clinic the next month, with his father, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, saying his son had not yet "regained his balance."

Shortly after taking office, he was deemed People magazine's sexiest politician in 1997 and became one of the most outspoken and quoted liberals in the House. There was a near-Hollywood buzz over his newly svelte figure in 2005 when he quietly dropped 50 pounds, disclosing months later that he had had weight-loss surgery.

Welcome to WLS + suspect malabsorption of medications.  We are a fun bunch!  :D

 

 

 

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Review – Before & After, Second Revised Edition: Living and Eating Well After Weight-Loss Surgery

Before & After, Second Revised Edition: Living and Eating Well After Weight-Loss Surgery

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Regurgitated Self-Importance Now With More Hate! 


A highlight from the OH Conference in Atlanta – Living Thin Within!

Recently the Obesity Help Conference I met this great woman, Jill.  Jill was to speak during the event, but I did not know that, nor did she introduce herself as anyone of importance.  

And we just TALKED AS PEERS.

Let me tell you something —

Woman Suffers from Lap Band Surgery Gone Wrong – Wernicke’s Disease

Neurological diseases sometimes occur (if very rarely) triggered in part by a weight loss surgical procedure for various reasons — some avoidable — some not, please don’t hate.  (Says she who developed a cognitive disorder and intractible epilepsy after weight loss surgery.  Be kind.)  The woman in the following story developed Wernicke’s Disease after gastric banding surgery in 2009.

Wernicke’s disease occurs at times with persistent vomiting after WLS, a study in Neurology (2007) states that in a review of cases a “majority of the patients (25 of the 32) had vomiting as a risk factor, and 21 had the classic Wernicke’s triad of confusion, ataxia, and nystagmus. Other symptoms seen in these patients included optic neuropathy, papilledema, deafness, seizures, asterixis (bilateral) flapping tremor of the hands and wrist, weakness, and sensory and motor neuropathies.”

  • A small number of cases, patients who undergo weight reduction surgery may develop Wernicke’s encephalopathy, marked by confusion and problems with movement and eye control.
  • The cause is a thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and, if detected, can be easily corrected with dietary supplements. Untreated, it can be fatal and cause severe neurologic morbidity.

Shacka says she suffers from multiple health issues because of a lap band surgery she had in California back in 2009. It went horribly wrong.  And since then her independence is gone and her life has never been the same.

“At some point, I say I don’t know what my life is supposed to be like now.  Like, where am I supposed to go?  Where do I fit in?,” said Shacka.

But what is lap band surgery?

“They’re a weight loss surgery where this band is placed around the top part of the stomach.  The bands have a balloon on the inside on the inner surface and through adjustments in clinic, the balloon can be tightened or loosened and help people feel full on a smaller amount of food,” said M.D. Corrigan McBride of the Nebraska Medical Center.

Officials from the Nebraska Medical Center say health issues with weight are a common factor for patients battling weight gain and obesity.

“There’s a certain percentage of patients that it’s just not the right weight loss tool for them and they will elect to have the bands removed and converted to a different surgery,” said McBride.

“I said I can’t do this anymore, I need to go to the hospital.  This is not right, I’m still throwing up.  And finally I went in, and by then I had double vision and that’s a sign of neurological disease,” said Shacka.

Shacka also suffers from Wernicke disease—a form of brain damage.  She says this was a result of her surgery.  Through years of therapy, learning how to walk, speak and use her hands again, Shacka says her journey to better health isn’t over.

“I beat the odds twice.  They told me I would be in a wheelchair for the rest of my life…and I’m walking.  They told me I would never do steps again, I went up four flights of steps with one physical therapist.  So I beat the odds and I need more additional help,” said Shacka.

But through this traumatic experience, Shacka says she sees the bright side of it all.


“I met some wonderful, wonderful angels who’ve helped me to know what life is about.  I can’t take that back and I would have never gotten it if I wouldn’t have gotten sick,” she said.

And her fight to spread awareness about the risks of lap band surgery keeps her motivated.

“You don’t give up, and I’m not going to give up.  And I guess this is my way of not giving up and living life,” she said.

Shacka plans to sue the doctors in California that did the surgery.  She’s had some financial struggles raising enough money to hire a lawyer, but finally met that goal.  Now, she is trying to raise enough money to receive therapy and more medical treatment at Mayo Clinic. 

Clin Nutr. 2000 Oct;19(5):371-3.  Wernicke’s syndrome after bariatric surgery.

 

Bone fracture risk increases after 3-5 years post weight loss surgery

Weight loss surgery doesn't increase the risk for bone fractures in the first two years after surgery, though the risk increases in the third year.  In other news, keep taking your calcium.

Medpage

Weight loss surgery did not predispose patients to an increased risk of fracture during the first 2 years after a bariatric procedure, data from a large retrospective cohort study showed.

The results showed an overall fracture risk of 8.8 per 1,000 person-years in the bariatric-surgery group and 8.2 per 1,000 person-years in the control group, which translated into an adjusted relative risk of 0.89, according to an article published online in BMJ.

In fact, the risk trended lower for patient who had weight-loss surgery, ranging from 10% to 33% lower, depending on the fracture outcome analyzed.

However, the fracture rate in bariatric patients started to increase when they were 3 to 5 years removed from surgery, leaving the long-term effects on bone health open to speculation.

"Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and has been associated with a reduction in bone density after the operation," study author Cyrus Cooper, MBBS, DM, of the University of Southampton in the U.K., said in a statement.

"This is the first time that we have been able to investigate risk of fracture following bariatric surgery by comparing patients with nonsurgical controls. The results suggest that, at least in the short term, such changes in bone density are unlikely to lead to increased fracture risk," he added.

Medpage

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Bariatric Surgery Most Common Elective Surgical Procedure – and safer!

Bariatric Surgery Most Common Elective Surgical Procedure

Within the setting of academic medical centers, bariatric surgery is the most common elective general surgical operation and it has the highest use of laparoscopy.  In addition, the in-hospital mortality rate of laparoscopic bariatric surgery is now comparable to those of laparoscopic appendectomy and antireflux surgery, and is currently lower than that of laparoscopic cholecystectomy."

Nice.  Go bariatric surgery, way to get safer.  Check it out –


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Alcoholism and the family – are you affected by someone else?

How do you know if you are affected by someone else's problem drinking?  Are you?

Via Al-Anon

Millions of people are affected by the excessive drinking of someone close. The following questions are designed to help you decide whether or not you need Al-Anon:

 1. Do you worry about how much someone drinks?

 2. Do you have money problems because of someone else’s drinking?

 3. Do you tell lies to cover up for someone else’s drinking?

 4. Do you feel that if the drinker cared about you, he or she would stop drinking to please you?

 5. Do you blame the drinker’s behavior on his or her companions?

 6. Are plans frequently upset or canceled or meals delayed because of the drinker?

 7. Do you make threats, such as, “If you don’t stop drinking, I’ll leave you”?

 8. Do you secretly try to smell the drinker’s breath?

 9. Are you afraid to upset someone for fear it will set off a drinking bout?

 10. Have you been hurt or embarrassed by a drinker’s behavior?

 11. Are holidays and gatherings spoiled because of drinking?

 12. Have you considered calling the police for help in fear of abuse?

 13. Do you search for hidden alcohol?

 14. Do you ever ride in a car with a driver who has been drinking?

 15. Have you refused social invitations out of fear or anxiety?

 16. Do you feel like a failure because you can’t control the drinking?

 17. Do you think that if the drinker stopped drinking, your other problems would be solved?

 18. Do you ever threaten to hurt yourself to scare the drinker?

 19. Do you feel angry, confused, or depressed most of the time?

 20. Do you feel there is no one who understands your problems?

If you have checked any of these questions, Al-Anon or Alateen may be able to help. Find a meeting now.