New

#itfits

It, fits?  OH COME ON.  

The NEW AND IMPROVED LAPBAND!  

You can do better!

New

Apollo Endosurgery, Inc., the leader in minimally invasive endoscopic surgical products for bariatric and gastrointestinal procedures, today announced the launch of the “It Fits” campaign, aimed at rejuvenating the LAP-BAND® System and educating a broad range of patients about the benefits of the minimally-invasive weight loss procedure.

“It Fits” supports the company’s decision to place greater emphasis on the unique advantage of the LAP-BAND® System – the only FDA approved device for weight reduction for people with at least one weight-related health problem, and having a BMI of 30 or greater.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1989812#ixzz34taKYjn9

The new ad spot – from Apollo – tugs right there at your heart, don't it?  I might be tearing up over all of the completely stereotypical situations right here in this here commercial!  OMG I CAN FIT IN THE AEROPLANE SEATBELT WITHOUT AN EXTENDER COULD YOU PLEASE PUT ME IN A COMMERCIAL ALTHOUGH I WAS NEVER SUPER MORBIDLY OBESE I AM JUST AN ACTOR!

Until this and my tears dry up!

Screen Shot 2014-06-17 at 7.33.40 AM

Because of course we will ignore the patient histories of thousands — to have a procedure to lose how much weight?  

Just as a frame of reference, that makes me qualify in a few BMI points.  Confession:  when I reached my high weight about the same time the new BMI-qualifications for the Allergan-owned lap-band came around, I decided THAT WAS IT.  I could not possibly do it again, my butt was not revising band-over-bypass for that much weight, not after watching this weight loss community for 12 years.  Nope.

Jawdrop

The Effectiveness and Risks of Bariatric Surgery – March 2014

Study - 

The Effectiveness and Risks of Bariatric Surgery

Importance  The prevalence of obesity and outcomes of bariatric surgery are well established. However, analyses of the surgery impact have not been updated and comprehensively investigated since 2003.

Objective  To examine the effectiveness and risks of bariatric surgery using up-to-date, comprehensive data and appropriate meta-analytic techniques.

Results  A total of 164 studies were included (37 randomized clinical trials and 127 observational studies). Analyses included 161 756 patients with a mean age of 44.56 years and body mass index of 45.62. We conducted random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses and meta-regression.

In randomized clinical trials, the mortality rate within 30 days was 0.08% (95% CI, 0.01%-0.24%); the mortality rate after 30 days was 0.31% (95% CI, 0.01%-0.75%). Body mass index loss at 5 years postsurgery was 12 to 17. T

he complication rate was 17% (95% CI, 11%-23%), and the reoperation rate was 7% (95% CI, 3%-12%).

Gastric bypass was more effective in weight loss but associated with more complications.

Adjustable gastric banding had lower mortality and complication rates; yet, the reoperation rate was higher and weight loss was less substantial than gastric bypass.

Sleeve gastrectomy appeared to be more effective in weight loss than adjustable gastric banding and comparable with gastric bypass.

Conclusions and Relevance  Bariatric surgery provides substantial and sustained effects on weight loss and ameliorates obesity-attributable comorbidities in the majority of bariatric patients, although risks of complication, reoperation, and death exist. Death rates were lower than those reported in previous meta-analyses.

The Effectiveness and Risks of Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery leads to lasting improvement in health, studies say – TOS/ASMBS

From studies presented at this year's Obesity Society – ASMBS meeting in Atlanta, new data on weight loss surgeries long-term efficacy.

Not too shabby.  

LA Times



Fifteen years after they have weight-loss surgery, almost a third of patients who had Type 2 diabetes at the time they were operated on remain free of the metabolic disorder, a new study says. And six years following such surgery, patients had shaved their probability of suffering a heart attack over the next 10 years by 40%, their stroke risk by 42%, and their likelihood of dying over the next five years by 18%, additional research has concluded.

The two studies, both presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in Atlanta, offer the first indications of weight-loss surgery's longer-term health benefits for patients. While researchers have demonstrated dramatic improvements in many bariatric patients' metabolic function in the short term, the durability of those improvements has been unclear.

Research suggests that over several years, many bariatric patients regain some of the weight they lose in the first two years — a fact that has raised doubts about the cost-effectiveness of the surgery, which can cost $20,000 to $25,000 for the initial procedure, plus a wide range of costs to treat complications after surgery.

The new studies' findings that patients' health prospects remain better for several more years may make weight-loss surgery a more appealing treatment for insurers to cover, and for obese patients with health concerns to seek out.

The study that followed 604 bariatric patients in Sweden for 15 years found that in the first two years after surgery, 72% achieved diabetes remission: They were able to cease taking medication for the metabolic condition. After 15 years, a little more than half of those had diabetes again. But 31% had remained in remission.

By contrast, only 16% of the comparison group — similarly obese patients with diabetes who did not get surgery — had seen their diabetes remit in the first two years. At 15 years out, diabetes remission was six times likelier in those who had surgery than in the those who did not.

In another study, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio followed bariatric patients for an average of six years after surgery. They tallied those patients' likelihoods of developing a wide range of health outcomes at the time of surgery and six years later, and compared them. To do so, they used the Framingham risk calculator to estimate the before-and-after 10-year risks of heart disease, stroke, death, kidney disease and complications such as diabetic retinopathy and poor circulation.

(The Framingham risk calculator is derived from probabilities gleaned from following more than 10,000 subjects in Framingham, Mass., in the Framingham Heart Study, which started in 1948.)

In this study, the bariatric patients lost 60% of their excess weight and 61% saw their diabetes remit after surgery. Overall, their risk of having coronary heart disease, stroke or peripheral heart disease dropped by 27%.

Bariatric surgeon Dr. John Morton, a professor of medicine at Stanford University who was not involved in either study, suggested that the results of more modern bariatric surgical procedures may be superior. He added that reducing the stress of obesity on the body, even if some weight returns, may improve a patient's long-term health prospects.

"Carrying extra weight can carry forth year to year," said Morton, who is president-elect of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He likened long-term obesity to smoking cigarettes for years, suggesting that the number of years a person remains obese (or smokes) may interact with their degree of obesity (or how much they smoke) to influence his or her likelihood of developing health problems.

 

Your Brain after Obesity Surgery

Your Brain after Obesity Surgery

We are not discussing my brain after bariatric surgery, we are discussing yours.  Because, mine is very special.  *insert photo of my special brain here*

Your brain after obesity surgery responds to food differently than before surgery and differently than it does after a behavioral weight program. Likewise, brain function improves in children with excess weight and low fitness after treatment with an aerobic exercise program. These observations come from two new studies in Obesity that provide a glimpse of the growing understanding about how obesity and its treatment affect brain function.

Amanda Bruce and colleagues compared functional MRI scans of a sample of patients before and after gastric banding surgery to scans from a matched sample of patients losing similar amounts of weight in a behavioral treatment program.

The demographics of the two samples were also matched. The found changes in brain responses to food for both groups after weight loss. But the nature of the changes were different.

The response to food cues by the banding patients suggested that the cues were less relevant and rewarding to them. Food cues seemed to command more attention from participants in behavioral weight programs than they did from band patients.

– See more at: http://conscienhealth.org/2013/10/your-brain-after-obesity-surgery/#sthash.hBbCJfvF.dpuf


Carnie Wilson Speaks At WLSFA 2013 Las Vegas Luncheon

Carnie Wilson Speaks At WLSFA 2013 Las Vegas Luncheon

Report: Some money in Lap-Band settlement to pay for billboards on weight-loss surgery risks

AP –  Report: Some money in Lap-Band settlement to pay for billboards on weight-loss surgery risks

LOS ANGELES — A company that promoted Lap-Band weight-loss surgery has agreed to pay $1.3 million to settle a false-advertising lawsuit, with some of the money going to billboards warning the public about the risks of weight-loss surgery, a newspaper reported Thursday.

From 2009 to 2011, five patients died after Lap-Band surgeries at clinics affiliated with the 1-800-GET-THIN ad campaign, according to the Los Angeles Times (http://lat.ms/11knLBS ).

The proposed settlement still needs the approval of Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kenneth Freeman, who asked attorneys at a hearing Thursday to provide more information and resubmit their settlement motion before he gives the deal his OK.

Relatives of two of the dead patients, Ana Renteria and Laura Faitro, filed the lawsuit as a class action in 2011.

The lawsuit sought damages from several companies and two brothers, Michael and Julian Omidi, who court documents said owned and managed Top Surgeons, a weight-loss business.

John Hueston, an attorney for the Omidis, said the settlement was not an admission of wrongdoing.

“Under the agreement, our clients … are dismissed without any admission of liability, and made no contribution whatsoever to the settlements,” Hueston said in a statement cited by the Times.

A lawyer for the surgery centers, Konrad Trope, said the action against the facilities was dismissed without admission of liability or financial penalty.

The proposed settlement will be paid only by Top Surgeons, one of the companies behind the GET-THIN operation, the newspaper said. The company did not immediately return a message from The Associated Press.

The lawsuits and other public documents showed that 1-800-GET-THIN was a marketing company that steered patients to a network of outpatient clinics, where thousands of weight-loss surgeries were performed.

The company used dozens of billboards — along with ads on television, radio and the Internet — to promote Lap-Band weight-loss surgery.

Some of the suits alleged that the clinics put profits above patient safety, employing physicians who were unqualified and allowing surgeries to be performed in unsanitary conditions, the Times said.

The proposed deal calls for $100,000 to be spent on billboard advertising throughout Southern California “intended to explain the risks of weight-loss surgery.” The agreement does not specify the language to be used in the ads but says it must be approved by the court.

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Regain After Weight Loss Surgery.

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Left –  Fitbloggin' 2012  Right – This Week – Lost the regain  - Also, 3 pounds to my lowest weight.

Several years ago, a woman messaged on a weight loss surgery forum and told me that my weight chart resembled a roller-coaster and that she wanted to "help me get control."  After a quick Google search — I noted she was seeking a new client for her weight loss surgery coaching business and dumped her "friendship."

Thumbs_Up!

Friends do not pay friends to help them lose weight, maintain weight loss or to help them lose regained weight after weight loss surgery.  If you are paying someone for your friendship, it might be time to redefine that friendship — just saying.  I suppose this changes if your friend happens to be a weight loss professional?  But how often does that happen — and how many weight loss professionals would potentially destroy a friendship with aligning with your weight loss journey?
Um.  No.  A professional would NOT.
  • Weight loss is personal.
  • It is something you choose for yourself when you are ready.
  • Weight loss is not something you can be talked into – nor shamed into.  

Regain after weight loss surgery is also a very touchy subject.  Countless bariatric patients go through it — and less want to talk about it.  But it seems like everyone wants to sell "us" something to fix it.  

Let me repeat –

  • Weight loss is personal.
  • It is something you choose for yourself when you are ready.
  • Weight loss is not something you can be talked into – nor shamed into.  

Yet it seems like the larger community wants "us"  (the regainers) to feel shamed for regaining and wants to sell us another quick-fix.

Let us discuss:  Regain is common.  How much?  Some is very typical.  Sometimes even a lot of regain is normal.  You do not have to be sold into another diet, quick-fix, or scam.  You need to remind yourself why you had weight loss surgery to begin with —

…for your HEALTH.  

Some good links on regain –

 

 

 

 


Weight Loss Surgery Connected to Increased Risk Of Colon Cancer

GET. YOUR. COLONOSCOPIES.  IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE.  Don't be scared. It's no big thing. Really. The preparation is harder than the procedure.  (My spouse is at this very moment, searching for a GI to make that appointment he canceled more than five years ago.  He's a high-risk patient with family history.)

With that, I tell you – BOTTOMS UP!

(Reuters Health) – Obesity is already linked to a higher risk of colon or rectal cancer, but a new study suggests this risk is even greater for obese people who have undergone weight-loss surgery.

Based on a study of more than 77,000 obese patients, Swedish and English researchers found the risk for colorectal cancer among those who have had obesity surgery is double that of the general population.

Though colorectal cancer risk among obese patients who didn't have the surgery was just 26 percent higher than in the general population, researchers said the results should not discourage people from going under the knife.

"These findings should not be used to guide decisions made by patients or doctors at all until the results are confirmed by other studies," said Dr. Jesper Lagergren, the new study's senior author and a professor at both the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and King's College London.

Each year more than 100,000 people in the U.S. have surgery to treat obesity.

Lagergren and his colleagues point out in their report, published in the Annals of Surgery, that obesity is tied to elevated risks for a number of cancers, including colorectal, breast and prostate (see Reuters Health story of November 3, 2011 here: reut.rs/t9sYxO).

Whether surgery to lose weight can affect those risks is uncertain.

Two earlier studies, one from the U.S. and the other from Sweden, found that the chances of obesity-related cancers decline after women have weight-loss surgery.

But an earlier study from Lagergren's group found the risks for breast and prostate cancers were unaffected by obesity surgery, and colorectal cancer risk increased.

To investigate that finding further, Lagergren's team collected 29 years' worth of medical records on more than 77,000 people in Sweden who were diagnosed as obese between 1980 and 2009. About 15,000 of them underwent weight loss surgery.

In the surgery group, 70 people developed colorectal cancer – a rate that was 60 percent greater than what would be expected for the larger Swedish population.

When the researchers looked only at people who had surgery more than 10 years before the end of the study period, the number of cancer cases was 200 percent greater than the expected risk for the general population.

In contrast, 373 people in the no-surgery group developed colorectal cancer, which was 26 percent more than would be expected in the population and that number remained stable over time.

A two-fold increased risk for colorectal cancer is not a "negligible risk increase, but it should not be of any major concern for the individual patient since the absolute risk is still low," Lagergren told Reuters Health in an email.

In the U.S., for instance, 40 out of every 100,000 women and roughly 53 out of every 100,000 men develop colorectal cancer each year.

Doubling that risk would make the annual figures 80 out of every 100,000 women and 106 out of every 100,000 men.

Lagergren said that more studies are needed to confirm his results before they should be included in clinical decision-making about whether patients should undergo weight-loss surgery.

The study results cannot prove that the surgery is the cause of the elevated cancer risk.

And, Lagergren says it's also not clear why the surgery might be tied to an elevated risk of colorectal cancer.

  • One possibility is that dietary changes after surgery, and increasing protein in particular, could raise cancer risk, he speculated.
  • Because the gut plays a significant role in the immune system, he added, "Another potential factor is that the bacteria that naturally reside in the intestines may change after surgery and alter future cancer risk."
  • Lagergren noted that he also couldn't rule out the possibility that residual excess weight and weight gain after surgery might be involved.

 

SOURCE: bit.ly/10TcCGy Annals of Surgery, online March 6, 2013

The study –

Annals of Surgery 

http://journals.lww.com/annalsofsurgery/Abstract/publishahead/Increased_Risk_of_Colorectal_Cancer_After_Obesity.98506.aspx

Abstract

  • Objective: The purpose was to determine whether obesity surgery is associated with a
    long-term increased risk of colorectal cancer.
  • Background: Long-term cancer risk after obesity surgery is not well characterized.
    Preliminary epidemiological observations and human tissue biomarker studies recently
    suggested an increased risk of colorectal cancer after obesity surgery.
  • Methods: A nationwide retrospective register-based cohort study in Sweden was
    conducted in 1980-2009. The long-term risk of colorectal cancer in patients who
    underwent obesity surgery, and in an obese no surgery cohort, was compared with that of
    the age-, sex- and calendar year-matched general background population between 1980
    and 2009. Obese individuals were stratified into an obesity surgery cohort and an obese
    no surgery cohort. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR), with 95% confidence interval
    (CI), was calculated.
  • Results: Of 77,111 obese patients, 15,095 constituted the obesity surgery cohort and 62,016
    constituted the obese no surgery cohort. In the obesity surgery cohort, we observed 70
    patients with colorectal cancer, rendering an overall SIR of 1.60 (95% CI 1.25-2.02). The
    SIR for colorectal cancer increased with length of time after surgery, with a SIR of 2.00
    (95% CI 1.48-2.64) after 10 years or more. In contrast, the overall SIR in the obese no
    surgery cohort (containing 373 colorectal cancers) was 1.26 (95% CI 1.14-1.40) and
    remained stable with increasing follow-up time.
  • Conclusions: Obesity surgery seems to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal
    cancer over time. These findings would prompt evaluation of colonoscopy surveillance for 
    the increasingly large population who undergo obesity surgery.