PAC MAN

FAAAAAHTS or Gastrointestinal colonization with methanogens increases difficulty of losing weight after bariatric surgery

Gastrointestinal colonization with methanogens increases difficulty of losing weight after bariatric surgery.

PAC MAN

This is totally my gut.
 
I feel like we knew this – have you lived with a gastric bypass or duodenal switch patient for a period of time?  I'm just saying, those of us with altered bariatric intestines  LIVE with "MARSH ASS."   Welcome to the world of pre-biotics, probiotics, fart-smell-better products and I kid you not, LINED UNDERWEAR.  

 
Hey, I never said I was a professional.  Read the studies.
 
What is a methanogen?  Wisegeek says —

"Methanogens are a type of microorganism that produces methane as a byproduct of metabolismin conditions of very low oxygen. They are often present in bogs, swamps, and other wetlands, where the methane they produce is known as "marsh gas." Methanogens also exist in the guts of some animals, including cows and humans, where they contribute to the methane content of flatulence. Though they were once classified as Archaebacteria, methanogens are now classified as Archaea, distinct from Bacteria.

Some types of methanogen, including those of the Methanopyrus genus, are extremophiles, organisms that thrive in conditions most living things could not survive in, such as hot springs, hydrothermal vents, hot desert soil, and deep subterranean environments. Others, such as those of the Methanocaldococcus genus, are mesophiles, meaning they thrive best in moderate temperatures.  Methanobrevibacter smithii is the prominent methanogen in the human gut, where it helps digest polysaccharides, or complex sugars."

Gut bacteria may decrease weight loss from bariatric surgery March 6, 2015
 

The benefits of weight loss surgery, along with a treatment plan that includes exercise and dietary changes, are well documented. In addition to a significant decrease in body mass, many patients find their risk factors for heart disease are drastically lowered and blood sugar regulation is improved for those with Type 2 diabetes.

Some patients, however, do not experience the optimal weight loss from bariatric surgery. The presence of a specific methane gas-producing organism in the gastrointestinal tract may account for a decrease in optimal weight loss, according to new research by Ruchi Mathur, MD, director of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment and Education Center at Cedars-Sinai.

"We looked at 156 obese adults who either had Roux-en-Y bypass surgery or received a gastric sleeve. Four months after surgery we gave them a breath test, which provides a way of measuring gases produced by microbes in the gut," said Mathur. "We found that those whose breath test revealed higher concentrations of both methane and hydrogen were the ones who had the lowest percentage of weight loss and lowest reduction in BMI (body mass index) when compared to others in the study."

The methane-producing microorganism methanobrevibacter smithii is the biggest maker of methane in the gut, says Mathur, and may be the culprit thwarting significant weight loss in bariatric patient. Mathur and her colleagues are conducting further studies to explore the role this organism plays in human metabolism.

While that research continues, bariatric patients may still have options to improve weight loss after surgery.

"Identifying individuals with this pattern of intestinal gas production may allow for interventions through diet. In the future there may be therapeutic drugs that can improve a patient's post-surgical course and help them achieve optimal weight loss," said Mathur.

The study, "Intestinal Methane Production is Associated with Decreased Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery" was done in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic. The paper is being presented by Mathur Thursday, March 5, at the 97th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego.

 

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Weight loss surgery: ‘not everyone lives happily ever after’ – Medical News Today

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Weight loss surgery: 'not everyone lives happily ever after' – Medical News Today.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272432.php

I realize this is a very small sample study, but I can't say I don't disagree with most of it after living this WLS-life for ten years and observing hundreds of people in it.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272432.php

All women had undergone gastric bypass surgery – one of the most common bariatric surgery procedures. It involves rerouting a part of the small intestine past the stomach in order to reduce food intake, promote satiety and suppress hunger.

The majority of the women were interviewed twice. The first time was 1 year after surgery, while the second interview took place 2.5-4 years following surgery.

Groven says although most previous research suggests that weight loss surgery leads to an increase in quality of life for the majority of patients, her findings suggest that not everyone lives happily ever after following bariatric procedures.

Positive outcomes after surgery 'can feel like grief'

There is no doubt that weight loss surgery puts the body through a series of radical changes.

Groven says that although the procedure leads to a slimmer body – which others perceive as a "sign of success" – the surgery can cause many smaller problems that other people are unable to see.

Groven explains:

"Becoming slimmer and lighter is mostly perceived of as positive. At the same time it is ambivalent, since people start to behave differently towards the women after they've had surgery.

People are friendlier than before, and this may feel extremely provoking. And people often ask very invasive questions concerning the woman's radical weight loss."

The interviews revealed that some of the women experienced a boost in self-esteem after surgery, were more outspoken, and found other people were more likely to listen to what they were saying – particularly in the workplace.

Groven notes that although these factors are clearly positive outcomes, this could also be seen as a "grief" because the women realize they had to undergo weight loss surgery before seeing these outcomes.

Many of the women also felt embarrassment after the surgery, particularly when it came to speaking about their weight loss. Some women told others they had been on a diet to lose the weight because they were ashamed to say they had undergone bariatric surgery.

Excess skin promotes a negative self-image

Groven found that many of the women had mixed feelings about their naked body after surgery, and many of these feelings come from the occurrence of loose skin – a common consequence of rapid weight loss.

"It is given little focus before the operation. Patients are often told that this is something that can be fixed afterwards. But it is not so easily fixed, and the women are not prepared for the challenge of having to live with the loose skin," explains Groven.

Although women can undergo surgery to remove excess skin, Groven notes that many women are not prepared to take the risks associated with this procedure, which include hematoma or seroma formation, infection and risks associated with future pregnancies.

Groven found that some of the women interviewed even spoke about their excess skin in third person, which she believes is a way of distancing themselves from it.

Health problems and bad food relationships after weight loss surgery

According to Groven, five of the women interviewed reported a lower quality of life after they underwent weight loss surgery, compared with their quality of life before.

She notes that this was down to the development of chronic stomach and intestine problems, and one woman became so ill that she had to endure another operation because of problems with her scar tissue after the gastric bypass procedure.

The five women also said they felt as if they had complete lack of energy following weight loss surgery.

Furthermore, Groven found that many of the women reported having a negative relationship with food after the procedure.

Some women were worried about eating too much or too little, or eating the wrong food at the wrong time. Because of these concerns, some women experienced tiredness, nausea, dizziness and even intense shaking.

Some of the women who had problems with overeating before weight loss surgery continued to overeat after surgery, even though this made them ill. Groven says some women commented that "the eating disorder is not gone."

Groven says that while previous research suggests that patients can avoid testing their eating limits after surgery by following dietary advice, the reality is much more complicated.

She adds:

"It is reasonable to ask, I think, whether the eating disorders that some of the women develop after surgery are diseases, or if they may be understood as normal changes as a result of the operation."

No regrets

Although many women reported negative thoughts and health issues after weight loss surgery, none of them said they regret undergoing the procedure.

"They say they would have done the same today and that they had no choice considering their life before surgery. Some said that the pains were a small price to pay," says Groven.

She adds that this suggests women are influenced by society's perception of the ideal female body, and that being obese is not within this scope.

"They are living with a body which is not accepted by society, and they are constantly judged from their size," she says.

"The message from the media and medical science is that they are likely to get cancer or diabetes unless they lose weight and the surrounding world regards their obesity as self-inflicted. Some have children and are afraid to die and leave them alone."

Groven concludes that although it is true that obesity can lead to health complications, such as diabetes and heart attack, little is known about the long-term effects of weight loss surgery and what complications may arise from this procedure.

With this in mind, Groven plans to conduct further research that will look at the effects of bariatric surgery 3-10 years after patients have undergone the procedure.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272432.php

 

Ruben Studdard – “I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do.”

Wendy Williams is not a nice person.  That's all I have to say about THAT.

Ruben, thank you for being classy and not tearing this woman's FACE OFF.

However – Ruben… DEAR.

"I was raised to believe that I can do anything. I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me and I have to stand firm on that belief. I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do. I should make sure I take responsibility for my health, and get in the gym and work it out."

WLS is not a easy route out, WLS is taking responsibility of ones health. 

Thank you, end of conversation.

 

Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery

What makes someone a Weight Loss Success long term after bariatric surgery?  

According to a study by Colleen Cook of BSCI – it's following the rules of your WLS.

I've heard her say it a hundred times at bariatric events – fall back to the RULES of your surgery – because it DOES WORK –

(Nodding in agreement – I am proof.)

Here's the study details from ASMBS/TOS 2013

Dietary support after bariatric surgery, along with pre-operative teaching and post-operative management, may mean the difference between weight-loss success and failure for patients with obesity, according to results of an on-line survey presented at the 31st Annual Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society (OBESITY 2013).

“This study confirms the need to put into place the resources to support people after bariatric surgery, including the dieticians and behavioural therapists who are actively involved with their patients, and can be critical to their success or failure,” stated American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery past president, Scott Shikora, MD, Center for Metabolic Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

People who have had bariatric surgery and are complying with the very basic principles of personal accountability, portion control, food intake, vitamins and supplements, proper nutrition and exercise are the ones who have been doing well long-term,” noted lead author Colleen M. Cook, Bariatric Support Centers International, Jordan, Utah, speaking here on November 14.

Cook and colleagues conducted a survey to assess adherence to specific, research-based, behavioural recommendations based on earlier research. Of their 535 total initial respondents, 255 were 5 or more years post-surgery. From this group, they took a final sample of 158 respondents comprised of 117 (74.05%) who reported achieving at least 80% of their excess body weight loss (the Highly Successful group) and 41 (25.9%) who reported achieving less than 40% of their excess body weight loss (the Not Highly Successful group).

The groups were compared on self-reported behaviours, including dietary intake, physical exercise, attendance at surgical follow-up visits, and participation in bariatric support groups.

The Highly Successful group reported significantly higher rates of compliance with dietary recommendations (P< .001); fewer total calories per day (1511.9 kCals versus 2190.0 kCals, P< .001 ); consuming a higher percentage of calories from protein (49% vs 36%; P< .001); higher frequency of eating protein first (P =.007); and lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates (31% vs 40%; P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was much more likely to regularly weigh themselves (P< .001); attend support groups (P = .002); and take supplemental multivitamins (P = .029), including calcium (P = .004), iron (P = .011), and B12 (P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was significantly less likely to eat mindlessly (P< .001); to “graze” (P< .001); to eat in front of the TV (= .002); to eat fast food (P< .001); and to eat food high in sugar (P< .001).

The groups also differed significantly on carbonated beverage (P = .02) and caffeine (P = .005) drinking patterns. The Highly Successful group reported significantly more physical activity at least several times per week than the Not Highly Successful group (P< .001).

The researchers found no significant differences, however, for ingestion of percentage calories from fat or the frequency of eating at sit-down restaurants, drinking calorie-laden liquids, or attending surgical clinic follow-ups.

Participants in this study averaged 51.7 years of age and 8.8 years post-surgery; 96% were female, 59% were married, and 89% were white. Both groups had similar demographics.

Funding for this study was provided by Bariatric Support Centers International.

[Presentation title: Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery. Abstract A-366-P]

Bariatric surgery leads to lasting improvement in health, studies say – TOS/ASMBS

From studies presented at this year's Obesity Society – ASMBS meeting in Atlanta, new data on weight loss surgeries long-term efficacy.

Not too shabby.  

LA Times



Fifteen years after they have weight-loss surgery, almost a third of patients who had Type 2 diabetes at the time they were operated on remain free of the metabolic disorder, a new study says. And six years following such surgery, patients had shaved their probability of suffering a heart attack over the next 10 years by 40%, their stroke risk by 42%, and their likelihood of dying over the next five years by 18%, additional research has concluded.

The two studies, both presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in Atlanta, offer the first indications of weight-loss surgery's longer-term health benefits for patients. While researchers have demonstrated dramatic improvements in many bariatric patients' metabolic function in the short term, the durability of those improvements has been unclear.

Research suggests that over several years, many bariatric patients regain some of the weight they lose in the first two years — a fact that has raised doubts about the cost-effectiveness of the surgery, which can cost $20,000 to $25,000 for the initial procedure, plus a wide range of costs to treat complications after surgery.

The new studies' findings that patients' health prospects remain better for several more years may make weight-loss surgery a more appealing treatment for insurers to cover, and for obese patients with health concerns to seek out.

The study that followed 604 bariatric patients in Sweden for 15 years found that in the first two years after surgery, 72% achieved diabetes remission: They were able to cease taking medication for the metabolic condition. After 15 years, a little more than half of those had diabetes again. But 31% had remained in remission.

By contrast, only 16% of the comparison group — similarly obese patients with diabetes who did not get surgery — had seen their diabetes remit in the first two years. At 15 years out, diabetes remission was six times likelier in those who had surgery than in the those who did not.

In another study, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio followed bariatric patients for an average of six years after surgery. They tallied those patients' likelihoods of developing a wide range of health outcomes at the time of surgery and six years later, and compared them. To do so, they used the Framingham risk calculator to estimate the before-and-after 10-year risks of heart disease, stroke, death, kidney disease and complications such as diabetic retinopathy and poor circulation.

(The Framingham risk calculator is derived from probabilities gleaned from following more than 10,000 subjects in Framingham, Mass., in the Framingham Heart Study, which started in 1948.)

In this study, the bariatric patients lost 60% of their excess weight and 61% saw their diabetes remit after surgery. Overall, their risk of having coronary heart disease, stroke or peripheral heart disease dropped by 27%.

Bariatric surgeon Dr. John Morton, a professor of medicine at Stanford University who was not involved in either study, suggested that the results of more modern bariatric surgical procedures may be superior. He added that reducing the stress of obesity on the body, even if some weight returns, may improve a patient's long-term health prospects.

"Carrying extra weight can carry forth year to year," said Morton, who is president-elect of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He likened long-term obesity to smoking cigarettes for years, suggesting that the number of years a person remains obese (or smokes) may interact with their degree of obesity (or how much they smoke) to influence his or her likelihood of developing health problems.