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The OAC is coming to Boston!

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Via OAC

The OAC is proud to announce that we are debuting a NEW pilot Your Weight Matters Local Events program with YWMLocal – Boston 2014! In less than a month, we will bring the Your Weight Matters message to Boston and the local surrounding community. 

  • We invite you to join us in Boston for this groundbreaking FREE educational event at the Westin Boston Waterfront on November 2, 2014, from 11:30 am – 4:00 pm.

The OAC welcomes our members and their family members, friends and colleagues from all throughout the northeast to this opportunity to experience a local OAC Event! We have secured an amazing line-up of topics and presenters who are ready to arm attendees with knowledge to get you started or back on your journey to improved weight and health. To view the educational topics presented, along with the speakers, please  CLICK HERE.

As part of our commitment to bringing our OAC members the best education and right tools for improving your weight and health, we are proudly producing this first YWMLocal Event, and hope to continue spreading the Your Weight Matters message with YWMLocal Events in other communities across the Nation. This is your chance as a valued OAC Member to connect with the OAC and your fellow OAC members in-person!

Any individual who wishes to benefit from this evidence-based education is welcome to attend, so pleaseshare the news with any family or friends you know in the Boston area! For all OAC members and ANYONE wishing to attend this great FREE event in Boston on November 2, please register now by CLICKING HERE!

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Study – Expectations for weight loss and willingness to accept risk among patients seeking weight loss surgery.

Just a warning, this is NOT a pleasant Rainbow and Butterflies study for those in the early or research stages of weight loss surgery.
Study –

Expectations for weight loss and willingness to except risk – JAMA

Importance  Weight loss surgery (WLS) has been shown to produce long-term weight loss but is not risk free or universally effective. The weight loss expectations and willingness to undergo perioperative risk among patients seeking WLS remain unknown.

Objectives  To examine the expectations and motivations of WLS patients and the mortality risks they are willing to undertake and to explore the demographic characteristics, clinical factors, and patient perceptions associated with high weight loss expectations and willingness to assume high surgical risk.

Design  We interviewed patients seeking WLS and conducted multivariable analyses to examine the characteristics associated with high weight loss expectations and the acceptance of mortality risks of 10% or higher.

Setting  Two WLS centers in Boston.

Participants  Six hundred fifty-four patients.

Main Outcome Measures  Disappointment with a sustained weight loss of 20% and willingness to accept a mortality risk of 10% or higher with WLS.

Results  On average, patients expected to lose as much as 38% of their weight after WLS and expressed disappointment if they did not lose at least 26%.

Most patients (84.8%) accepted some risk of dying to undergo WLS, but only 57.5% were willing to undergo a hypothetical treatment that produced a 20% weight loss.

The mean acceptable mortality risk to undergo WLS was 6.7%, but the median risk was only 0.1%; 19.5% of all patients were willing to accept a risk of at least 10%.

Women were more likely than men to be disappointed with a 20% weight loss but were less likely to accept high mortality risk.

After initial adjustment, white patients appeared more likely than African American patients to have high weight loss expectations and to be willing to accept high risk.

Patients with lower quality-of-life scores and those who perceived needing to lose more than 10% and 20% of weight to achieve “any” health benefits were more likely to have unrealistic weight loss expectations.

Low quality-of-life scores were also associated with willingness to accept high risk.

Conclusions and Relevance 

Most patients seeking WLS have high weight loss expectations and believe they need to lose substantial weight to derive any health benefits.

Educational efforts may be necessary to align expectations with clinical reality.

/end study

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NO SHIT, REALLY?!  Go back and READ IT AGAIN.

Now go read this: http://www.drsharma.ca/how-much-are-people-willing-to-risk-for-bariatric-surgery.html

WHAT HAVE WE BEEN TELLING YOU?!  Please.  START.  LISTENING.

Boston, you’re my home.

A few days ago, we coming home from Beth Israel Hospital (where my neurologist is located – another post to come…) on a different route suggested by my car's GPS system.  It brought us through downtown Boston.  I distinctly recall commenting on the brick buildings – and how I'd be the perfect resident to this area of Boston, because I am a pedestrian non-driving citizen – and "Look at all the places I could walk to!" and then the realization of the $800,000 and up price-tags hit me.

Today it was torn apart.  By bombs.

This is not supposed to happen here — nor anywhere.  This feels like we have stepped (again?) into a movie.  Earlier today I was watching The Boston Marathon while I walked on the treadmill.  I watched the winners cross the finish line.  I had no idea the trauma that would unfold later today.  

Just.  Too.  Much.

“One of the marvelous things about community is that it enables us to welcome and help people in a way we couldn't as individuals. When we pool our strength and share the work and responsibility, we can welcome many people, even those in deep distress, and perhaps help them find self-confidence and inner healing.” 

― Jean VanierCommunity And Growth

How can you help?