Type 2 Diabetes Remission Greater With Gastric Bypass vs Intensive Lifestyle Intervention

RNY works for Type 2 Diabetes.  Studies keep proving it.

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Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery yielded greater type 2 diabetes remission in mild or moderately obese patients compared with intensive lifestyle and medical intervention, according to data published in Diabetologia.

The researchers screened 1808 adults aged 25 to 64 years with type 2 diabetes and a body mass index (BMI) ranging from 30 kg/m2 to 45 kg/m2 and allocated 43 participants by concealed, computer-generated random assignment.  Participants were assigned to undergo RYGB or intensive lifestyle and medical intervention.

 

The participants in the intensive lifestyle/medical intervention cohort exercised 5 days per week for at least 45 minutes. Their diet was directed by a dietitian to lower weight and glucose levels, and all participants had optimal diabetes medical treatment for 1 year.

“Our trial and other relevant [randomized controlled trials] demonstrate that commonly used bariatric/metabolic operations (RYGB, sleeve gastrectomy, and gastric banding) are all more effective than a variety of medical and/or lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss, diabetes remission, glycemic control, and improvements in other CVD (cardiovascular disease) risk factors, with acceptable complications, for at least 1 to 3 years,” the authors wrote.

Fifteen participants underwent RYGB and 17 were assigned to the intensive lifestyle/medical intervention. Participants were followed for 1 year, and all were equivalent in baseline characteristics, although the RYGB cohort had a longer diabetes duration (11.4 vs 6.8 years; P=.009).

The percentage of weight loss at 1 year was 25.8% among participants who underwent RYGB and 6.4% in the intensive lifestyle/medical intervention group (P<.001). Participants in the intensive lifestyle/medical intervention exercise program had a 22% increase in VO2max (P<.001), while the VO2max levels in the RYGB group remained unchanged.

The rate of diabetes remission at 1 year was 60% in the RYGB group and 5.9% with the intensive lifestyle/medication intervention (P=.002). HbA1c declined in the RYGB cohort from 7.7% (60.7 mmol/mol) to 6.4% (46.4 mmol/mol), and the intensive lifestyle/medication intervention cohort's HbA1 declined from 7.3% (56.3 mmol/mol) to 6.9% (51.9 mmol/mol), although the decrease occurred with fewer diabetes medications after RYGB (P=.04).

“These results apply to patients with a BMI <35 kg/m2, and our study and others show that neither baseline BMI nor the amount of weight lost dependably predicts diabetes remission after RYGB, which appears to ameliorate diabetes through mechanisms beyond just weight reduction,” the authors noted.

“These findings call into serious question the longstanding practice of using strict BMI cutoffs as the primary criteria for surgical selection among patients with type 2 diabetes.”

Reference

  1. Cummings DE, Arterburn DE, Westbrook EO, et al. Gastric bypass surgery vs intensive lifestyle and medical intervention for type 2 diabetes: the CROSSROADS randomized controlled trial. Diabetologia. 2016. doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-3903-x.

Bariatric surgery leads to lasting improvement in health, studies say – TOS/ASMBS

From studies presented at this year's Obesity Society – ASMBS meeting in Atlanta, new data on weight loss surgeries long-term efficacy.

Not too shabby.  

LA Times



Fifteen years after they have weight-loss surgery, almost a third of patients who had Type 2 diabetes at the time they were operated on remain free of the metabolic disorder, a new study says. And six years following such surgery, patients had shaved their probability of suffering a heart attack over the next 10 years by 40%, their stroke risk by 42%, and their likelihood of dying over the next five years by 18%, additional research has concluded.

The two studies, both presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in Atlanta, offer the first indications of weight-loss surgery's longer-term health benefits for patients. While researchers have demonstrated dramatic improvements in many bariatric patients' metabolic function in the short term, the durability of those improvements has been unclear.

Research suggests that over several years, many bariatric patients regain some of the weight they lose in the first two years — a fact that has raised doubts about the cost-effectiveness of the surgery, which can cost $20,000 to $25,000 for the initial procedure, plus a wide range of costs to treat complications after surgery.

The new studies' findings that patients' health prospects remain better for several more years may make weight-loss surgery a more appealing treatment for insurers to cover, and for obese patients with health concerns to seek out.

The study that followed 604 bariatric patients in Sweden for 15 years found that in the first two years after surgery, 72% achieved diabetes remission: They were able to cease taking medication for the metabolic condition. After 15 years, a little more than half of those had diabetes again. But 31% had remained in remission.

By contrast, only 16% of the comparison group — similarly obese patients with diabetes who did not get surgery — had seen their diabetes remit in the first two years. At 15 years out, diabetes remission was six times likelier in those who had surgery than in the those who did not.

In another study, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio followed bariatric patients for an average of six years after surgery. They tallied those patients' likelihoods of developing a wide range of health outcomes at the time of surgery and six years later, and compared them. To do so, they used the Framingham risk calculator to estimate the before-and-after 10-year risks of heart disease, stroke, death, kidney disease and complications such as diabetic retinopathy and poor circulation.

(The Framingham risk calculator is derived from probabilities gleaned from following more than 10,000 subjects in Framingham, Mass., in the Framingham Heart Study, which started in 1948.)

In this study, the bariatric patients lost 60% of their excess weight and 61% saw their diabetes remit after surgery. Overall, their risk of having coronary heart disease, stroke or peripheral heart disease dropped by 27%.

Bariatric surgeon Dr. John Morton, a professor of medicine at Stanford University who was not involved in either study, suggested that the results of more modern bariatric surgical procedures may be superior. He added that reducing the stress of obesity on the body, even if some weight returns, may improve a patient's long-term health prospects.

"Carrying extra weight can carry forth year to year," said Morton, who is president-elect of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He likened long-term obesity to smoking cigarettes for years, suggesting that the number of years a person remains obese (or smokes) may interact with their degree of obesity (or how much they smoke) to influence his or her likelihood of developing health problems.

 

Understanding and Managing Food #Addiction (and SUGAR!) Livestream Video Via Obesity Action Coalition (OAC)

  • Absolutely worth the watch if you like good brain food.
  • Dr. Nicole Avena is a research neuroscientist and expert in the fields of nutrition, diet and addiction. She received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Psychology from Princeton University, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in molecular biology at The Rockefeller University in New York City. She has published over 50 scholarly journal articles, as well as several book chapters and a book, on topics related to food, addiction, obesity and eating disorders. She also edited the book, Animal Models of Eating Disorders (2012) and has a popular book of food and addiction coming out in 2014 (Ten Speed Press). Her research achievements have been honored by awards from several groups including the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Psychological Association, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Eating Disorders Association. She also maintains a blog, Food Junkie, with Psychology Today.
Type 2 Diabetes Finger Stick

Weight Loss Surgery Doesn’t Cure Diabetes, forever – Sorry.

"I had weight loss surgery and beat diabetes, FOREVER!"  Not so much.

Don't buy that tee shirt just yet.

Type 2 Diabetes Finger Stick

NYT

Many people whose diabetes at first went away were likely to have it return. While weight regain is a common problem among those who undergo bariatric surgery, regaining lost weight did not appear to be the cause of diabetes relapse. Instead, the study found that people whose diabetes was most severe or in its later stages when they had surgery were more likely to have a relapse, regardless of whether they regained weight.

“Some people are under the impression that you have surgery and you’re cured,” said Dr. Vivian Fonseca, the president for medicine and science for the American Diabetes Association, who was not involved in the study. “There have been a lot of claims about how wonderful surgery is for diabetes, and I think this offers a more realistic picture.”

The findings suggest that weight loss surgery may be most effective for treating diabetes in those whose disease is not very advanced. “What we’re learning is that not all diabetic patients do as well as others,” said Dr. David E. Arterburn, the lead author of the study and an associate investigator at the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle. “Those who are early in diabetes seem to do the best, which makes a case for potentially earlier intervention.”

Obes Surg. 2012 Nov 18. [Epub ahead of print]

A Multisite Study of Long-term Remission and Relapse of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Following Gastric Bypass.

Source

Group Health Research Institute, 1730 Minor Ave, Suite 1600, Seattle, WA, 98101, USA, arterburn.d@ghc.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gastric bypass has profound effects on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The goal of this study was to examine the long-term rates and clinical predictors of diabetes remission and relapse among patients undergoing gastric bypass.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adults with uncontrolled or medication-controlled type 2 diabetes who underwent gastric bypass from 1995 to 2008 in three integrated health care delivery systems in the USA. Remission and relapse events were defined by diabetes medication use and clinical laboratory measures of glycemic control. We identified 4,434 adults with uncontrolled or medication-controlled type 2 diabetes who had gastric bypass.

RESULTS:

Overall, 68.2 % (95 % confidence interval [CI], 66 and 70 %) experienced an initial complete diabetes remission within 5 years after surgery. Among these, 35.1 % (95 % CI, 32 and 38 %) redeveloped diabetes within 5 years. The median duration of remission was 8.3 years. Significant predictors of complete remission and relapse were poor preoperative glycemic control, insulin use, and longer diabetes duration. Weight trajectories after surgery were significantly different for never remitters, relapsers, and durable remitters (p = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

Gastric bypass surgery is associated with durable remission of type 2 diabetes in many but not all severely obese diabetic adults, and about one third experience a relapse within 5 years of initial remission. More research is needed to understand the mechanisms of diabetes relapse, the optimal timing of surgery in effecting a durable remission, and the relationship between remission duration and incident microvascular and macrovascular events.

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Gabriel Iglesias – Not so fluffy

My kids LOVE this man.  We saw him last night at the Cape Cod Melody Tent in Hyannis, MA –

Gabriel Iglesias has been described as unbelievably witty, electrifying and as a talented performer who has the ability to consistently deliver a uniquely hilarious comedy experience –from start to finish – in every venue he performs in. His high-octane show is a sure-fire hit: a mixture of storytelling, parodies, characters and sound effects that bring all his personal experiences to life. Gabriel’s clean and animated comedy style has earned national crossover appeal, making him popular among fans of all ages. Ask anyone who has seen him in concert and you will probably hear the same thing, “Fluffy was SO funny!”

And he's getting skinny, yo.  I have no photos or video, I got in trouble for having my Phone On With Facebook On The Screen, sooo…

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He's less fluffy than before and while his schtick has been, "I like cake!"  he ain't eating it anymore. Gabriel announced last night that he's dealing with Type II diabetes and eating healthy. His Twitter stream appears to include sugar-free protein shakes.

Yeah. I said it.  GO  YOU, Gabriel.

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(A very happy Gabriel fan.)