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Recommended Carbohydrate Levels After Gastric Bypass

Via Bariatric Times

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After you read this study, let's discuss:  

  • Did your nutritionist give YOU guidance in regards to carbohydrate intake after your roux en y gastric bypass surgery?
  • Background: Exact carbohydrate levels needed for the bariatric patient population have not yet been defined. The aim of this study was to correlate carbohydrate intake to percent excess weight loss for the bariatric patient population based on a cross-sectional study. The author also aimed to review the related literature.
  • Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, along with a review of the literature, about patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at least 1 year previously. Patients had their percentage of excess weight loss calculated and energy intake was examined based on data collected with a four-day food recall. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) patients who consumed 130g/day or more of carbohydrates and 2) patients who consumed less than 130g/day of carbohydrates. 
  • Limitations: The literature review was limited to papers published since 1993. 
  • Results: Patients who consumed 130g/day or more of carbohydrates presented a lower percent excess weight loss than the other group (p= 0.038). In the review of the literature, the author found that six months after surgery patients can ingest about 850kcal/day of carbohydrates, 30 percent being ingested as lipids. A protein diet with at least 60g/day is needed. On this basis, patients should consume about 90g/day of carbohydrates. After the first postoperative year, energy intake is about 1,300kcal/day and protein consumption should be increased. We can, therefore, establish nearly 130g/day of carbohydrates (40% of their energy intake) 
  • Conclusions: Based on these studies, the author recommends that 90g/day is adequate for patients who are six months post Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and less than 130g/day is adequate for patients who are one year or more post surgery. 
  • The author concludes that maintaining carbohydrate consumption to moderate quantities and adequate protein intake seems to be fundamental to ensure the benefits from bariatric surgery.



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http://bariatrictimes.com/recommended-levels-of-carbohydrate-after-bariatric-surgery/

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Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update

The Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient has been updated for the first time since 2008.   There are changes and updates and suggestions for your clinicians – the entire text is available online below –

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Download here –

Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient – 2013 Update


Abstract: The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of

clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the
evidence and subjective factors per protocol.

Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery forpatients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues.


A lifetime history of substance abuse disorder is more likely in bariatric surgery candidates compared with the general population (211 [EL 3, SS]). In contrast, current alcohol and substance abuse in bariatric surgery candidates is low compared with the general population (211 [EL 3, SS]). The LABS study demonstrated that certain groups including those with regular preoperative alcohol consumption, alcohol use disorder, recreational drug use, smokers, and those undergoing RYGB had a higher risk of postoperative alcohol use disorder (212 [EL 2, PCS]). A web-based questionnaire study indicated that 83% of respondents continued to consume alcohol after RYGB, with 28.4% indicating a problem controlling alcohol (213 [EL 3, SS]). In a prospective study with 13- to 15-year follow-up after RYGB, there was an increase in alcohol abuse (2.6% presurgery to 5.1% postsurgery) but a decrease in alcohol dependence (10.3% presurgery versus 2.6% postsurgery) (214 [EL 2, PCS]).  In a survey 6-10 years after RYGB, 7.1% of patients had alcohol abuse or dependence before surgery, which was unchanged postoperatively, whereas 2.9% admitted to alcohol dependence after surgery but not before surgery (215 [EL 3, SS]). Finally, in a retrospective review of a large electronic database, 2%-6% of bariatric surgery admissions were positive for a substance abuse history (216 [EL 3, SS]). Interestingly, 2 studies have demonstrated better weight loss outcomes among patients with a past substance abuse history compared with those without past alcohol abuse.

Bariatric surgery remains a safe and
effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues.


Obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States, with more than one third of adults considered obese in 2009- 2010, as defined by a body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2 (1 [EL 3,

SS]). Obesity has been associated with an increased hazard ratio for all-cause mortality (2 [EL 3, SS]), as well as significant medical and psychological co-morbidity. Indeed, obesity is not only a chronic
medical condition but should be regarded as a bona fide disease state (3 [EL 4, NE]). Nonsurgical management can effectively induce 5%-10% weight loss and improve health in severely obese
individuals (4 [EL 1, RCT]) resulting in cardiometabolic benefit. Bariatric surgery procedures are indicated for patients with clinically severe obesity. Currently, these procedures are the most successful and durable treatment for obesity. Furthermore, although overall obesity rates and bariatric surgery procedures have plateaued in the United States, rates of severe obesity are still increasing and now
there are approximately 15 million people in the United States with a BMI 40 kg/m2 (1 [EL 3, SS]; 5 [EL 3, SS]). Only 1% of the clinically eligible population receives surgical treatment for obesity
(6 [EL 3, SS]). Given the potentially increased need for bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity, it is apparent that clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on the subject keep pace and are kept current.

Since the 2008 TOS/ASMBS/AACE CPG for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient (7 [EL 4; CPG]), significant data have emerged regarding a broader range of available surgeries for the treatment of obesity. A PubMed computerized literature search (performed on December 15, 2012) using the search term ‘‘bariatric surgery’’ reveals a total of 14,287 publications with approximately 6800 citations from 2008 to 2012. Updated CPG are therefore needed to guide clinicians in the care of the bariatric surgery patient.

What are the salient advances in bariatric surgery since 2008?

  • The sleeve gastrectomy (SG; laparoscopic SG [LSG]) has demonstrated benefits comparable to other bariatric procedures and is no longer considered investigational (8 [EL 4, NE]).  
  • A national risk-adjusted database positions SG between the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in terms of weight loss, co-morbidity resolution, and complications (9 [EL 2, PCS]). 
  • The number of SG procedures has increased with greater third-party pay or coverage (9 [EL 2, PCS]). 
  • Other unique procedures are gaining attention, such as gastric plication, electrical neuromodulation, and endoscopic sleeves, but these procedures lack sufficient outcome evidence and therefore remain investigational and outside the scope of this CPG update.
  • There is also emerging data on bariatric surgery in specific patient populations, including those with mild to moderate obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) with class I obesity (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m2), and patients at the extremes of age. Clinical studies have demonstrated short-term efficacy of LAGB in mild to moderate obesity (10 [EL 1, RCT]; 11 [EL 2, PCS]; 12 [EL 2, PCSA]; 13 [EL 3, SS]), leading the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve the use of LAGB for patients with a BMI of 30 to 35 kg/m2 with T2D or other obesity-related co-morbidities (14 [EL 4, NE]). Although controversial, this position was incorporated by the International Diabetes Federation, which proposed eligibility for bariatric procedures in a subset of patients with T2D and a BMI of 30 kg/m2 with suboptimal glycemic control despite optimal medical management (15 [EL 4, NE]). Thus, the term metabolic surgery has emerged to describe procedures intended to treat T2D as well as reduce cardiometabolic risk factors. In 1 study, metabolic surgery was shown to induce T2D remission in up to 72% of subjects at 2 years; however, this number was reduced to 36% at 10 years (16 [EL 2, PCS]). In a more recent study, patients who underwent RYGB sustained diabetes remission rates of 62% at 6 years (17 [EL 2, PCS]). The overall long-term effect of bariatric surgery on T2D remission rates is currently not well studied. Additionally, for patients who have T2D recurrence several years after surgery, the legacy effects of a remission period on their long-term cardiovascular risk is not known. The mechanism of T2D remission has not been completely elucidated but appears to include an incretin effect (SG and RYGB procedures) in addition to caloric restriction and weight loss. These findings potentially expand the eligible population for bariatric and metabolic surgery.

Download here – via –

Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient—2013 update: Cosponsored by american association of clinical endocrinologists, The obesity society, and american society for metabolic & bariatric surgery* (pages S1–S27)

Jeffrey I. Mechanick, Adrienne Youdim, Daniel B. Jones, W. Timothy Garvey, Daniel L. Hurley, M. Molly McMahon, Leslie J. Heinberg, Robert Kushner, Ted D. Adams, Scott Shikora, John B. Dixon and Stacy Brethauer

Article first published online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/oby.20461



 

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People Magazine – Half Their Size – No Surgery! No Gimmicks – A Rant from a Bariatric Patient.

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I watched ABC's 20/20 on Friday night as I typically do, and I was half-inspired, refreshed to push forward in my own journey as I continue to press on nearing nine years post gastric bypass surgery and ever so slightly PISSED OFF.  Why?  Read that cover again.  "No SURGERY – No GIMMICKS!"

People Magazine does this every year, much to the chagrin to every surgically altered bariatric patient in the blog-o-sphere.  ABC.  People Magazine.  The show and the magazine, both — FULL OF GIMMICKS, and quite possibly more than one surgery.  "No SURGERY – No GIMMICKS!"

 Except when they're touting Beachbody, "lost the weight Atkins" AND a gastric bypass?    
Why is it celebrated to Lose Weight With Diet Plans like "Beachbody, Visalus and Atkins"   (All three were referred to in the program to at one point in the program … were they sponsors?  Hello, RUBY GETTINGER IS HAWKING the 90-DAY VISALUS CHALLENGE?!?!) but life-saving bariatric
surgery or weight loss surgery — is shunned in the same category?  Diets fail.  That's why they are so lucrative!  You go ON a diet so that you can fail a diet so that you can get on a diet so that you can fail a diet so you can go on a diet.  This is how people become morbidly obese and meet bariatric surgeons.
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(Image from Roni's Weigh)

I get it.  Diet companies pay to be on the show and in the magazine.
 
However, those living with morbid obesity also need to see the opportunity for success, and showing them the success of those who have succeeded with bariatric surgery is not something to be ashamed of.  Clearly SHAME made the woman in the article hide.

It's time to stop calling weight loss surgery a quick-fix, a gimmick or a cheat and give it the respect and attention it deserves.  The individuals who most benefit from having a bariatric procedure can be exposed to it's benefits instead of a constant barrage of useless diet advertisements.
WLS is the ONLY "diet" that has allowed myself, my husband, my mother in law and my sister in law  to live within normal weight ranges for the last 7-9 years.  What say you about your diet?
Gastric Bypass

Living on borrowed time – Health Benefits of Gastric Bypass Surgery Persist for Six Years

“It’s very relevant,” Dr. Ponce said. “There were tremendous benefits with the surgical group. The control groups showed if you don’t do surgery, the patients will continue to have diabetes. The longer you leave it alone, the more problems you’ll have.”

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Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery

"My doctor said my blood work looks great.  I'm going to stop taking my vitamins."  

-Said someone in my group today

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Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery have an estimated incidence of up to 16% per year and need to be discussed with patients who are considering surgery. Neurological deficits are most commonly associated with nutritional deficiencies that develop following surgery. The most commonly described nutritional deficiencies include thiamine (B1), B12, folate, vitamin D, vitamin E, and copper deficiencies.Risk factors for nutritional complications include vitamin noncompliance, protracted vomiting, and excessive alcohol consumption.

Download study

Signed,

Nine year RNY post op with permanent cognitive neurological disorders.