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Fexaramine Tricks Mice Into Losing Weight Without Food?!

Lose weight without worrying about food? Imagine this?!

Via Popular Science "Safe and effective weight loss doesn't yet come in a pill, but maybe one day it will. A new study has found a chemical that keeps mice from gaining weight through overeating. The drug also seemed to protect lab mice from some of the harmful effects of obesity: When researchers measured the mice's blood, they found reduced levels of insulin, cholesterol, and other molecules, compared to obese mice who didn't get the drug."

'Imaginary meal' tricks the body into losing weight – Salk Institute – News Release.

“This pill is like an imaginary meal,” says Ronald Evans, director of Salk’s Gene Expression Laboratoryand senior author of the new paper, published January 5, 2014 in Nature Medicine. “It sends out the same signals that normally happen when you eat a lot of food, so the body starts clearing out space to store it. But there are no calories and no change in appetite.”

In the United States, more than a third of adults are obese and 29.1 million people have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Both obesity and diabetes lead to an increase in health spending, a greater risk of health complications and a shorter lifespan.

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Study - http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.3760.html

#myfatstory

 

Katie Hopkins: My Fat Story

Discovery - http://press.discovery.com/uk/tlc/programs/katie-hopkins/

Premieres Friday 2nd January, 9.00pm

Outspoken TV personality, Katie Hopkins has hit the headlines for her controversial views on obesity; insisting that fat people are lazy, saying that she would not employ someone who is overweight, and claiming that losing weight is easy. Earlier this year Katie hit the headlines again revealing her new three stone heavier figure. Sick of hearing people's excuses for being overweight and justifying Britain's obesity crisis, Katie had decided to prove her argument by piling on the pounds to experience being weight, before attempting to lose it again by simply eating less and moving more. This two-part special exclusively follows Katie through every step of her project, as she struggles to put the weight on and deal with her increasing size, and then as she loses the weight. Will she prove her point or will she have to eat her own words?

Probably not.  It's different in the UK right now, the National Health System is socialised medicine, and the patients have their weight-loss surgeries done "on the system" sometimes waiting a long time for treatment — and people may feel differently about the care being done on the UK's dime.  

I suppose I'd have to watch it, and it's meant to be inflammatory.   I mean — "FAT PEOPLE ARE LAZY."

Really.  Throw that out there and watch the reaction.  BAIT.  FLAME.  RAWR.

Would you watch?  What do you think?

taste tongue

Bariatric Surgery Linked To Increased TASTE Sensitivity – Does Taste Perception CHANGE After Bariatric Surgery?

taste tongue

I think mine is broken. I go for SALTY every time.

I hereby define this study in the flesh.  Everything tastes too, everything to me.

-MM

Via Science Daily from ASMBS –

People with obesity may have an unexpected ally after weight-loss surgery: their tongues. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine finds patients who reported a decrease in taste intensity after bariatric surgery had significantly higher excess weight loss after three months than those whose taste intensity became higher.

Findings from the new study, "Does Taste Perception Change After Bariatric Surgery?", were presented here at the 31st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) during ObesityWeek 2014, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. ObesityWeek 2014 is hosted by the ASMBS and The Obesity Society (TOS).

In the study, the majority (87%) of patients reported a change in taste after bariatric surgery, with 42 percent reporting they ate less because food didn't taste as good. However, those who said their taste intensity decreased, lost 20 percent more weight over three months, than those whose taste intensified.

"In our clinical experience, many patients report alterations in their perception of taste after bariatric surgery. However, little evidence exists as to how and why these changes affect weight loss after surgery," said study author John M. Morton MD, Chief, Bariatric and Minimally Invasive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine. "It appears it's not just the flavor that influences weight loss, it's the intensity of the flavor. Patients with diminished taste intensity lost the most weight. A potential application to these findings may include teaching taste appreciation in hopes of increasing weight loss."

Before surgery, patients with severe obesity had lower total taste scores than a control group of individuals with no obesity. The 88 patients in the study were on average, 49-years-old, had an average age of 49.2 years, more than half were female with an average preoperative body mass index (BMI) of 45.3. Prior to surgery, the patients and controls completed a baseline validated taste test that quantified their ability to identify the primary taste, using paper strips with varying concentrations of each taste solution, presented in random order. The tests were then performed again at 3-, 6- and 12-months after surgery.

"The study provides excellent new insight on taste change after bariatric surgery," said Jaime Ponce, MD, medical director for Hamilton Medical Center Bariatric Surgery program and ASMBS immediate past-president. "More research is needed to see how we can adjust for taste perception to increase weight loss."

Study - American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). (2014, November 4). For some, losing weight after bariaric surgery may be a matter of taste.ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 5, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141104083132.htm

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The OAC is coming to Boston!

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Via OAC

The OAC is proud to announce that we are debuting a NEW pilot Your Weight Matters Local Events program with YWMLocal – Boston 2014! In less than a month, we will bring the Your Weight Matters message to Boston and the local surrounding community. 

  • We invite you to join us in Boston for this groundbreaking FREE educational event at the Westin Boston Waterfront on November 2, 2014, from 11:30 am – 4:00 pm.

The OAC welcomes our members and their family members, friends and colleagues from all throughout the northeast to this opportunity to experience a local OAC Event! We have secured an amazing line-up of topics and presenters who are ready to arm attendees with knowledge to get you started or back on your journey to improved weight and health. To view the educational topics presented, along with the speakers, please  CLICK HERE.

As part of our commitment to bringing our OAC members the best education and right tools for improving your weight and health, we are proudly producing this first YWMLocal Event, and hope to continue spreading the Your Weight Matters message with YWMLocal Events in other communities across the Nation. This is your chance as a valued OAC Member to connect with the OAC and your fellow OAC members in-person!

Any individual who wishes to benefit from this evidence-based education is welcome to attend, so pleaseshare the news with any family or friends you know in the Boston area! For all OAC members and ANYONE wishing to attend this great FREE event in Boston on November 2, please register now by CLICKING HERE!

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Weight loss surgery: ‘not everyone lives happily ever after’ – Medical News Today

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Weight loss surgery: 'not everyone lives happily ever after' – Medical News Today.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272432.php

I realize this is a very small sample study, but I can't say I don't disagree with most of it after living this WLS-life for ten years and observing hundreds of people in it.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272432.php

All women had undergone gastric bypass surgery – one of the most common bariatric surgery procedures. It involves rerouting a part of the small intestine past the stomach in order to reduce food intake, promote satiety and suppress hunger.

The majority of the women were interviewed twice. The first time was 1 year after surgery, while the second interview took place 2.5-4 years following surgery.

Groven says although most previous research suggests that weight loss surgery leads to an increase in quality of life for the majority of patients, her findings suggest that not everyone lives happily ever after following bariatric procedures.

Positive outcomes after surgery 'can feel like grief'

There is no doubt that weight loss surgery puts the body through a series of radical changes.

Groven says that although the procedure leads to a slimmer body – which others perceive as a "sign of success" – the surgery can cause many smaller problems that other people are unable to see.

Groven explains:

"Becoming slimmer and lighter is mostly perceived of as positive. At the same time it is ambivalent, since people start to behave differently towards the women after they've had surgery.

People are friendlier than before, and this may feel extremely provoking. And people often ask very invasive questions concerning the woman's radical weight loss."

The interviews revealed that some of the women experienced a boost in self-esteem after surgery, were more outspoken, and found other people were more likely to listen to what they were saying – particularly in the workplace.

Groven notes that although these factors are clearly positive outcomes, this could also be seen as a "grief" because the women realize they had to undergo weight loss surgery before seeing these outcomes.

Many of the women also felt embarrassment after the surgery, particularly when it came to speaking about their weight loss. Some women told others they had been on a diet to lose the weight because they were ashamed to say they had undergone bariatric surgery.

Excess skin promotes a negative self-image

Groven found that many of the women had mixed feelings about their naked body after surgery, and many of these feelings come from the occurrence of loose skin – a common consequence of rapid weight loss.

"It is given little focus before the operation. Patients are often told that this is something that can be fixed afterwards. But it is not so easily fixed, and the women are not prepared for the challenge of having to live with the loose skin," explains Groven.

Although women can undergo surgery to remove excess skin, Groven notes that many women are not prepared to take the risks associated with this procedure, which include hematoma or seroma formation, infection and risks associated with future pregnancies.

Groven found that some of the women interviewed even spoke about their excess skin in third person, which she believes is a way of distancing themselves from it.

Health problems and bad food relationships after weight loss surgery

According to Groven, five of the women interviewed reported a lower quality of life after they underwent weight loss surgery, compared with their quality of life before.

She notes that this was down to the development of chronic stomach and intestine problems, and one woman became so ill that she had to endure another operation because of problems with her scar tissue after the gastric bypass procedure.

The five women also said they felt as if they had complete lack of energy following weight loss surgery.

Furthermore, Groven found that many of the women reported having a negative relationship with food after the procedure.

Some women were worried about eating too much or too little, or eating the wrong food at the wrong time. Because of these concerns, some women experienced tiredness, nausea, dizziness and even intense shaking.

Some of the women who had problems with overeating before weight loss surgery continued to overeat after surgery, even though this made them ill. Groven says some women commented that "the eating disorder is not gone."

Groven says that while previous research suggests that patients can avoid testing their eating limits after surgery by following dietary advice, the reality is much more complicated.

She adds:

"It is reasonable to ask, I think, whether the eating disorders that some of the women develop after surgery are diseases, or if they may be understood as normal changes as a result of the operation."

No regrets

Although many women reported negative thoughts and health issues after weight loss surgery, none of them said they regret undergoing the procedure.

"They say they would have done the same today and that they had no choice considering their life before surgery. Some said that the pains were a small price to pay," says Groven.

She adds that this suggests women are influenced by society's perception of the ideal female body, and that being obese is not within this scope.

"They are living with a body which is not accepted by society, and they are constantly judged from their size," she says.

"The message from the media and medical science is that they are likely to get cancer or diabetes unless they lose weight and the surrounding world regards their obesity as self-inflicted. Some have children and are afraid to die and leave them alone."

Groven concludes that although it is true that obesity can lead to health complications, such as diabetes and heart attack, little is known about the long-term effects of weight loss surgery and what complications may arise from this procedure.

With this in mind, Groven plans to conduct further research that will look at the effects of bariatric surgery 3-10 years after patients have undergone the procedure.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272432.php

 

Future diets: Obesity is on the rise globally

1 in 3 – Alarming

Future diets: Obesity is on the rise globally

Explore more infographics like this one
 
One in three adults in the world (1.46 billion) were overweight or obese in 2008, up by 23% since 1980. Read more of the findings of this ODI report at http://www.odi.org.uk/future-diets
 

Ruben Studdard – “I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do.”

Wendy Williams is not a nice person.  That's all I have to say about THAT.

Ruben, thank you for being classy and not tearing this woman's FACE OFF.

However – Ruben… DEAR.

"I was raised to believe that I can do anything. I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me and I have to stand firm on that belief. I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do. I should make sure I take responsibility for my health, and get in the gym and work it out."

WLS is not a easy route out, WLS is taking responsibility of ones health. 

Thank you, end of conversation.