PAC MAN

FAAAAAHTS or Gastrointestinal colonization with methanogens increases difficulty of losing weight after bariatric surgery

Gastrointestinal colonization with methanogens increases difficulty of losing weight after bariatric surgery.

PAC MAN

This is totally my gut.
 
I feel like we knew this – have you lived with a gastric bypass or duodenal switch patient for a period of time?  I'm just saying, those of us with altered bariatric intestines  LIVE with "MARSH ASS."   Welcome to the world of pre-biotics, probiotics, fart-smell-better products and I kid you not, LINED UNDERWEAR.  

 
Hey, I never said I was a professional.  Read the studies.
 
What is a methanogen?  Wisegeek says —

"Methanogens are a type of microorganism that produces methane as a byproduct of metabolismin conditions of very low oxygen. They are often present in bogs, swamps, and other wetlands, where the methane they produce is known as "marsh gas." Methanogens also exist in the guts of some animals, including cows and humans, where they contribute to the methane content of flatulence. Though they were once classified as Archaebacteria, methanogens are now classified as Archaea, distinct from Bacteria.

Some types of methanogen, including those of the Methanopyrus genus, are extremophiles, organisms that thrive in conditions most living things could not survive in, such as hot springs, hydrothermal vents, hot desert soil, and deep subterranean environments. Others, such as those of the Methanocaldococcus genus, are mesophiles, meaning they thrive best in moderate temperatures.  Methanobrevibacter smithii is the prominent methanogen in the human gut, where it helps digest polysaccharides, or complex sugars."

Gut bacteria may decrease weight loss from bariatric surgery March 6, 2015
 

The benefits of weight loss surgery, along with a treatment plan that includes exercise and dietary changes, are well documented. In addition to a significant decrease in body mass, many patients find their risk factors for heart disease are drastically lowered and blood sugar regulation is improved for those with Type 2 diabetes.

Some patients, however, do not experience the optimal weight loss from bariatric surgery. The presence of a specific methane gas-producing organism in the gastrointestinal tract may account for a decrease in optimal weight loss, according to new research by Ruchi Mathur, MD, director of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment and Education Center at Cedars-Sinai.

"We looked at 156 obese adults who either had Roux-en-Y bypass surgery or received a gastric sleeve. Four months after surgery we gave them a breath test, which provides a way of measuring gases produced by microbes in the gut," said Mathur. "We found that those whose breath test revealed higher concentrations of both methane and hydrogen were the ones who had the lowest percentage of weight loss and lowest reduction in BMI (body mass index) when compared to others in the study."

The methane-producing microorganism methanobrevibacter smithii is the biggest maker of methane in the gut, says Mathur, and may be the culprit thwarting significant weight loss in bariatric patient. Mathur and her colleagues are conducting further studies to explore the role this organism plays in human metabolism.

While that research continues, bariatric patients may still have options to improve weight loss after surgery.

"Identifying individuals with this pattern of intestinal gas production may allow for interventions through diet. In the future there may be therapeutic drugs that can improve a patient's post-surgical course and help them achieve optimal weight loss," said Mathur.

The study, "Intestinal Methane Production is Associated with Decreased Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery" was done in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic. The paper is being presented by Mathur Thursday, March 5, at the 97th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego.

 

Fiber-Weight-Loss

Weight Loss RX = FIBER

Fiber-Weight-Loss

PCRM - 

Adopting a vegetarian diet causes weight loss, even in the absence of exercise or calorie counting, according to a new meta-analysis published as an online advance in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015.

The mega-review analyzed 15 studies, conducted with 755 participants in Finland, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. The studies varied in length, from as short as four weeks to as long as two years, with an average weight loss of 10 pounds over a 44-week period.

“The take-home message is that a plant-based diet can help you lose weight without counting calories and without ramping up your exercise routine,” saysNeal Barnard, M.D., lead author of the study, president of the Physicians Committee, and an adjunct associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. “We hope health care providers will take note and prescribe this approach to patients looking to manage their weight and health.”

One of the secrets behind losing weight on a plant-based diet is to fill up with fiber. The Physicians Committee recommends consuming close to 40 grams of fiber a day, which is easy to do when you move vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes to the center of your plate.

More than 1.4 billion adults worldwide are overweight and at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, and certain forms of cancer.

“If you’re overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can slash the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease,” says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., a study author and director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee. “As the weight comes off, you’ll start to see blood pressure, blood sugar, triglycerides, and cholesterol fall right along with it.”

 

New

#itfits

It, fits?  OH COME ON.  

The NEW AND IMPROVED LAPBAND!  

You can do better!

New

Apollo Endosurgery, Inc., the leader in minimally invasive endoscopic surgical products for bariatric and gastrointestinal procedures, today announced the launch of the “It Fits” campaign, aimed at rejuvenating the LAP-BAND® System and educating a broad range of patients about the benefits of the minimally-invasive weight loss procedure.

“It Fits” supports the company’s decision to place greater emphasis on the unique advantage of the LAP-BAND® System – the only FDA approved device for weight reduction for people with at least one weight-related health problem, and having a BMI of 30 or greater.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1989812#ixzz34taKYjn9

The new ad spot – from Apollo – tugs right there at your heart, don't it?  I might be tearing up over all of the completely stereotypical situations right here in this here commercial!  OMG I CAN FIT IN THE AEROPLANE SEATBELT WITHOUT AN EXTENDER COULD YOU PLEASE PUT ME IN A COMMERCIAL ALTHOUGH I WAS NEVER SUPER MORBIDLY OBESE I AM JUST AN ACTOR!

Until this and my tears dry up!

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Because of course we will ignore the patient histories of thousands — to have a procedure to lose how much weight?  

Just as a frame of reference, that makes me qualify in a few BMI points.  Confession:  when I reached my high weight about the same time the new BMI-qualifications for the Allergan-owned lap-band came around, I decided THAT WAS IT.  I could not possibly do it again, my butt was not revising band-over-bypass for that much weight, not after watching this weight loss community for 12 years.  Nope.

Jawdrop

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Ethicon Bariatric Surgery Comparison Tool Online – What can you lose?

I am easily distracted online by quizzes, gadgets, tools, and "Who Will You Be When You Grow Up?"  (Which said TEACHER, BTW, ME, The Kid Who Failed Half Her High School Classes…) quizzes, which is when I saw this - Online Tool Designed to Help Patients Evaluate Potential Bariatric Surgery Outcomes – thingamajig – I did it myself even though I am already ten years and two months post gastric bypass.

How cool is this?

Are you considering weight loss surgery?  Check this out.

LA Times –

A new tool nveiled at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery may help patients with a body mass index over 30 — the threshold at which obesity is diagnosed — to navigate those complexities. Based on the accumulated experiences of 75,000 bariatric surgery patients, the Bariatric Surgery Comparison Tool details the expected outcomes of gastric banding surgery, gastric bypass surgery and sleeve gastrectomy, the three most common bariatric procedures.

I did it myself, based on my start weight – height – though I have lost an inch of height.  (Shut up.)

Start weight – 320, start height 5 ft 4.  I am close to 5 ft 3 now.

Are you considering weight loss surgery?  Check this out.

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And now –

Screen Shot 2014-06-07 at 8.24.16 AM
 

And the tool gave me these results based on the potentials of experiences of 75,000 patients (… surveyed out of the most common WLS) 

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The stats for the gastric bypass are damn close to what my surgeon "quoted" me for my landing place after my procedure.  

I bottomed out lower than this, my very lowest was 147 lbs, but wouldn't you know I bounced exactly to 175 lbs and maintained around there for a good portion of the years after my RNY?  The gastric bypass got me there, everything after that was a lot more work.  (See the blog.  I was pregnant immediately after.  And, so on.  This was 2005, guys.)  

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The 24 month data is EXACTLY right!  I am ten years post op and 149 – 158 lbs!

I guess what I am saying is — that the data for this "tool" —  (and you know I loathe that word) is there, it is right on the money.

Some goobledegook from Ethicon - 

  • The tool (officially named the Ethicon Bariatric Surgery Comparison Tool) pools data from more than 75,000 U.S. people who have had bariatric surgery, and based on personally provided, anonymous information, shows what people of similar demographics have experienced after undergoing bariatric surgery. The tool shows data for gastric bypass, sleeve, and adjustable gastric band surgeries.

o   Ethicon understands that no two patients are identical.  For example, when considering bariatric surgery, obesity related conditions like diabetes, hypertension and cholesterol need to be taken into consideration – this tool helps do just that.

o   Based on patients who have had similar conditions to theirs, prospective patients using the tool are able to see what surgical outcome looked like for patients just like them and can use this as a discussion point with their doctor about  which treatment option might be most appropriate for them (i.e., gastric bypass, gastric sleeve or gastric band).

 Now is a promising time for people in need of support for obesity and illnesses associated with it (such as type 2 diabetes).  There are safe, effective ways for physicians to help patients better manage their conditions.  There’s a growing body of clinical evidence that shows that bariatric surgery not only helps with weight loss, but that it also can help with issues like type 2 diabetes.

Some things you should know about bariatric surgery and the tool

Bariatric surgery is used in severely obese adult patients for significant long-term weight loss. It may not be right for individuals with certain digestive tract conditions. All surgery presents risks. Weight, age, and medical history determine your specific risks. Individuals should ask their doctor if bariatric surgery is right for them.

The tool is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a medical evaluation, examination, consultation, diagnosis or treatment. The tool provides potential results by procedure type including pounds lost and medication reduction over time based on personal information provided by the user of the tool. Patients should consult a physician or other health care provider to determine whether or not bariatric surgery is right for them and for guidance on expected outcomes benefits and risks.

The weight loss, medication, and diagnosis information provided by the tool is derived from statistical analysis of historical claims and clinical databases as well as research published in peer-reviewed journals. While predictive modeling techniques were used, the results cannot predict the specific outcomes for any individual. The information presented does not represent any statement, promise or guarantee by Ethicon Inc. concerning a patient’s eligibility, experience, or potential outcomes. Individual patient results may vary.

 I had gastric bypass in 4/2004 in Boston, MA with Dr. Michael Tarnoff

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Non Scale V I C T O R Y – You Are VICTORIOUS.

“Get Off The Scale!
You are beautiful. Your beauty, just like your capacity for life, happiness, and success, is immeasurable. Day after day, countless people across the globe get on a scale in search of validation of beauty and social acceptance.
Get off the scale! I have yet to see a scale that can tell you how enchanting your eyes are. I have yet to see a scale that can show you how wonderful your hair looks when the sun shines its glorious rays on it. I have yet to see a scale that can thank you for your compassion, sense of humor, and contagious smile. Get off the scale because I have yet to see one that can admire you for your perseverance when challenged in life.
It’s true, the scale can only give you a numerical reflection of your relationship with gravity. That’s it. It cannot measure beauty, talent, purpose, life force, possibility, strength, or love. Don’t give the scale more power than it has earned. Take note of the number, then get off the scale and live your life. You are beautiful!”

― Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free