©geballe-sitting

A very powerful self-photography project of weight loss surgery.

Finally.  Something I can post.

©geballe-sitting

"Currently, Samantha's work focuses on conceptual portraiture, allowing her to explore human emotion from the inside out. She is working on an on-going self-portrait series focused on body image and healing that challenges viewers to question what is means to accept oneself. "

©geballe-stomach

 

Her photos are shocking if not absolutely realistic and raw if you have lost hundred(s) of pounds with weight loss surgery

If you have yet to do so, I would not be alarmed.  Question the photos.  Dig into them.  Feel it.  This is is what we know.

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Cropped image. 

taste tongue

Bariatric Surgery Linked To Increased TASTE Sensitivity – Does Taste Perception CHANGE After Bariatric Surgery?

taste tongue

I think mine is broken. I go for SALTY every time.

I hereby define this study in the flesh.  Everything tastes too, everything to me.

-MM

Via Science Daily from ASMBS –

People with obesity may have an unexpected ally after weight-loss surgery: their tongues. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine finds patients who reported a decrease in taste intensity after bariatric surgery had significantly higher excess weight loss after three months than those whose taste intensity became higher.

Findings from the new study, "Does Taste Perception Change After Bariatric Surgery?", were presented here at the 31st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) during ObesityWeek 2014, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. ObesityWeek 2014 is hosted by the ASMBS and The Obesity Society (TOS).

In the study, the majority (87%) of patients reported a change in taste after bariatric surgery, with 42 percent reporting they ate less because food didn't taste as good. However, those who said their taste intensity decreased, lost 20 percent more weight over three months, than those whose taste intensified.

"In our clinical experience, many patients report alterations in their perception of taste after bariatric surgery. However, little evidence exists as to how and why these changes affect weight loss after surgery," said study author John M. Morton MD, Chief, Bariatric and Minimally Invasive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine. "It appears it's not just the flavor that influences weight loss, it's the intensity of the flavor. Patients with diminished taste intensity lost the most weight. A potential application to these findings may include teaching taste appreciation in hopes of increasing weight loss."

Before surgery, patients with severe obesity had lower total taste scores than a control group of individuals with no obesity. The 88 patients in the study were on average, 49-years-old, had an average age of 49.2 years, more than half were female with an average preoperative body mass index (BMI) of 45.3. Prior to surgery, the patients and controls completed a baseline validated taste test that quantified their ability to identify the primary taste, using paper strips with varying concentrations of each taste solution, presented in random order. The tests were then performed again at 3-, 6- and 12-months after surgery.

"The study provides excellent new insight on taste change after bariatric surgery," said Jaime Ponce, MD, medical director for Hamilton Medical Center Bariatric Surgery program and ASMBS immediate past-president. "More research is needed to see how we can adjust for taste perception to increase weight loss."

Study - American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). (2014, November 4). For some, losing weight after bariaric surgery may be a matter of taste.ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 5, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141104083132.htm

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Ethicon Bariatric Surgery Comparison Tool Online – What can you lose?

I am easily distracted online by quizzes, gadgets, tools, and "Who Will You Be When You Grow Up?"  (Which said TEACHER, BTW, ME, The Kid Who Failed Half Her High School Classes…) quizzes, which is when I saw this - Online Tool Designed to Help Patients Evaluate Potential Bariatric Surgery Outcomes – thingamajig – I did it myself even though I am already ten years and two months post gastric bypass.

How cool is this?

Are you considering weight loss surgery?  Check this out.

LA Times –

A new tool nveiled at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery may help patients with a body mass index over 30 — the threshold at which obesity is diagnosed — to navigate those complexities. Based on the accumulated experiences of 75,000 bariatric surgery patients, the Bariatric Surgery Comparison Tool details the expected outcomes of gastric banding surgery, gastric bypass surgery and sleeve gastrectomy, the three most common bariatric procedures.

I did it myself, based on my start weight – height – though I have lost an inch of height.  (Shut up.)

Start weight – 320, start height 5 ft 4.  I am close to 5 ft 3 now.

Are you considering weight loss surgery?  Check this out.

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And now –

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And the tool gave me these results based on the potentials of experiences of 75,000 patients (… surveyed out of the most common WLS) 

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The stats for the gastric bypass are damn close to what my surgeon "quoted" me for my landing place after my procedure.  

I bottomed out lower than this, my very lowest was 147 lbs, but wouldn't you know I bounced exactly to 175 lbs and maintained around there for a good portion of the years after my RNY?  The gastric bypass got me there, everything after that was a lot more work.  (See the blog.  I was pregnant immediately after.  And, so on.  This was 2005, guys.)  

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The 24 month data is EXACTLY right!  I am ten years post op and 149 – 158 lbs!

I guess what I am saying is — that the data for this "tool" —  (and you know I loathe that word) is there, it is right on the money.

Some goobledegook from Ethicon - 

  • The tool (officially named the Ethicon Bariatric Surgery Comparison Tool) pools data from more than 75,000 U.S. people who have had bariatric surgery, and based on personally provided, anonymous information, shows what people of similar demographics have experienced after undergoing bariatric surgery. The tool shows data for gastric bypass, sleeve, and adjustable gastric band surgeries.

o   Ethicon understands that no two patients are identical.  For example, when considering bariatric surgery, obesity related conditions like diabetes, hypertension and cholesterol need to be taken into consideration – this tool helps do just that.

o   Based on patients who have had similar conditions to theirs, prospective patients using the tool are able to see what surgical outcome looked like for patients just like them and can use this as a discussion point with their doctor about  which treatment option might be most appropriate for them (i.e., gastric bypass, gastric sleeve or gastric band).

 Now is a promising time for people in need of support for obesity and illnesses associated with it (such as type 2 diabetes).  There are safe, effective ways for physicians to help patients better manage their conditions.  There’s a growing body of clinical evidence that shows that bariatric surgery not only helps with weight loss, but that it also can help with issues like type 2 diabetes.

Some things you should know about bariatric surgery and the tool

Bariatric surgery is used in severely obese adult patients for significant long-term weight loss. It may not be right for individuals with certain digestive tract conditions. All surgery presents risks. Weight, age, and medical history determine your specific risks. Individuals should ask their doctor if bariatric surgery is right for them.

The tool is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a medical evaluation, examination, consultation, diagnosis or treatment. The tool provides potential results by procedure type including pounds lost and medication reduction over time based on personal information provided by the user of the tool. Patients should consult a physician or other health care provider to determine whether or not bariatric surgery is right for them and for guidance on expected outcomes benefits and risks.

The weight loss, medication, and diagnosis information provided by the tool is derived from statistical analysis of historical claims and clinical databases as well as research published in peer-reviewed journals. While predictive modeling techniques were used, the results cannot predict the specific outcomes for any individual. The information presented does not represent any statement, promise or guarantee by Ethicon Inc. concerning a patient’s eligibility, experience, or potential outcomes. Individual patient results may vary.

 I had gastric bypass in 4/2004 in Boston, MA with Dr. Michael Tarnoff

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Stomach Balloon For Weight Loss

Terrifyingly simple.

This is the Obalon system. It is a pill that has a balloon inside. Obalon is a weight-loss device, marketed as an alternative to bariatric surgery, that claims to help people eat less and "push back from the table sooner."

Obalon begins to work when you swallow Obalon and it lands in your stomach. Obalon remains temporarily attached to a thin tube, through which doctors can inflate it. They then remove the thin tube, and the balloon stays in your stomach for up to three months, bobbing around like buoy in gastric waters. You can take up to three at a time, the manufacturers say. The idea is that balloons partly fill your stomach to make you feel full, so you eat less. They are too big and buoyant to pass beyond the stomach. After twelve weeks, a doctor deflates the balloons and pulls them back out through your mouth.

  

 
 
 
 
 
 

“This balloon will act to educate [people] about portion size and retrain their brain and their mindset a little,” Dr. Sally Norton, a U.K. bariatric surgeon, told CBS News.

The Obalon balloon pill is approved for investigational use only in the U.S. However, it is approved in the E.U. and is available in Austria, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Spain. What better way to see Europe than with expensive stomach balloons?

Would you do it — would you swallow a belly balloon for twelve weeks for weight loss and have it removed?

Balloon-pop

I suppose I'd have to see the size of the "pill" first.  I kid you not.   (Hey — I had my stomach and intestines realigned, I cannot judge one who chooses something LESS invasive.)

The Atlantic - http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/01/this-weight-loss-pill-turns-into-a-balloon-to-fill-your-stomach/283399/



Ruben Studdard – “I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do.”

Wendy Williams is not a nice person.  That's all I have to say about THAT.

Ruben, thank you for being classy and not tearing this woman's FACE OFF.

However – Ruben… DEAR.

"I was raised to believe that I can do anything. I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me and I have to stand firm on that belief. I feel like taking the easy route out is not something I should do. I should make sure I take responsibility for my health, and get in the gym and work it out."

WLS is not a easy route out, WLS is taking responsibility of ones health. 

Thank you, end of conversation.

 

Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery

What makes someone a Weight Loss Success long term after bariatric surgery?  

According to a study by Colleen Cook of BSCI – it's following the rules of your WLS.

I've heard her say it a hundred times at bariatric events – fall back to the RULES of your surgery – because it DOES WORK –

(Nodding in agreement – I am proof.)

Here's the study details from ASMBS/TOS 2013

Dietary support after bariatric surgery, along with pre-operative teaching and post-operative management, may mean the difference between weight-loss success and failure for patients with obesity, according to results of an on-line survey presented at the 31st Annual Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society (OBESITY 2013).

“This study confirms the need to put into place the resources to support people after bariatric surgery, including the dieticians and behavioural therapists who are actively involved with their patients, and can be critical to their success or failure,” stated American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery past president, Scott Shikora, MD, Center for Metabolic Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

People who have had bariatric surgery and are complying with the very basic principles of personal accountability, portion control, food intake, vitamins and supplements, proper nutrition and exercise are the ones who have been doing well long-term,” noted lead author Colleen M. Cook, Bariatric Support Centers International, Jordan, Utah, speaking here on November 14.

Cook and colleagues conducted a survey to assess adherence to specific, research-based, behavioural recommendations based on earlier research. Of their 535 total initial respondents, 255 were 5 or more years post-surgery. From this group, they took a final sample of 158 respondents comprised of 117 (74.05%) who reported achieving at least 80% of their excess body weight loss (the Highly Successful group) and 41 (25.9%) who reported achieving less than 40% of their excess body weight loss (the Not Highly Successful group).

The groups were compared on self-reported behaviours, including dietary intake, physical exercise, attendance at surgical follow-up visits, and participation in bariatric support groups.

The Highly Successful group reported significantly higher rates of compliance with dietary recommendations (P< .001); fewer total calories per day (1511.9 kCals versus 2190.0 kCals, P< .001 ); consuming a higher percentage of calories from protein (49% vs 36%; P< .001); higher frequency of eating protein first (P =.007); and lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates (31% vs 40%; P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was much more likely to regularly weigh themselves (P< .001); attend support groups (P = .002); and take supplemental multivitamins (P = .029), including calcium (P = .004), iron (P = .011), and B12 (P = .001).

The Highly Successful group was significantly less likely to eat mindlessly (P< .001); to “graze” (P< .001); to eat in front of the TV (= .002); to eat fast food (P< .001); and to eat food high in sugar (P< .001).

The groups also differed significantly on carbonated beverage (P = .02) and caffeine (P = .005) drinking patterns. The Highly Successful group reported significantly more physical activity at least several times per week than the Not Highly Successful group (P< .001).

The researchers found no significant differences, however, for ingestion of percentage calories from fat or the frequency of eating at sit-down restaurants, drinking calorie-laden liquids, or attending surgical clinic follow-ups.

Participants in this study averaged 51.7 years of age and 8.8 years post-surgery; 96% were female, 59% were married, and 89% were white. Both groups had similar demographics.

Funding for this study was provided by Bariatric Support Centers International.

[Presentation title: Factors Distinguishing Weight Loss Success and Failure at Five or More Years Post Bariatric Surgery. Abstract A-366-P]

Bariatric surgery leads to lasting improvement in health, studies say – TOS/ASMBS

From studies presented at this year's Obesity Society – ASMBS meeting in Atlanta, new data on weight loss surgeries long-term efficacy.

Not too shabby.  

LA Times



Fifteen years after they have weight-loss surgery, almost a third of patients who had Type 2 diabetes at the time they were operated on remain free of the metabolic disorder, a new study says. And six years following such surgery, patients had shaved their probability of suffering a heart attack over the next 10 years by 40%, their stroke risk by 42%, and their likelihood of dying over the next five years by 18%, additional research has concluded.

The two studies, both presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in Atlanta, offer the first indications of weight-loss surgery's longer-term health benefits for patients. While researchers have demonstrated dramatic improvements in many bariatric patients' metabolic function in the short term, the durability of those improvements has been unclear.

Research suggests that over several years, many bariatric patients regain some of the weight they lose in the first two years — a fact that has raised doubts about the cost-effectiveness of the surgery, which can cost $20,000 to $25,000 for the initial procedure, plus a wide range of costs to treat complications after surgery.

The new studies' findings that patients' health prospects remain better for several more years may make weight-loss surgery a more appealing treatment for insurers to cover, and for obese patients with health concerns to seek out.

The study that followed 604 bariatric patients in Sweden for 15 years found that in the first two years after surgery, 72% achieved diabetes remission: They were able to cease taking medication for the metabolic condition. After 15 years, a little more than half of those had diabetes again. But 31% had remained in remission.

By contrast, only 16% of the comparison group — similarly obese patients with diabetes who did not get surgery — had seen their diabetes remit in the first two years. At 15 years out, diabetes remission was six times likelier in those who had surgery than in the those who did not.

In another study, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio followed bariatric patients for an average of six years after surgery. They tallied those patients' likelihoods of developing a wide range of health outcomes at the time of surgery and six years later, and compared them. To do so, they used the Framingham risk calculator to estimate the before-and-after 10-year risks of heart disease, stroke, death, kidney disease and complications such as diabetic retinopathy and poor circulation.

(The Framingham risk calculator is derived from probabilities gleaned from following more than 10,000 subjects in Framingham, Mass., in the Framingham Heart Study, which started in 1948.)

In this study, the bariatric patients lost 60% of their excess weight and 61% saw their diabetes remit after surgery. Overall, their risk of having coronary heart disease, stroke or peripheral heart disease dropped by 27%.

Bariatric surgeon Dr. John Morton, a professor of medicine at Stanford University who was not involved in either study, suggested that the results of more modern bariatric surgical procedures may be superior. He added that reducing the stress of obesity on the body, even if some weight returns, may improve a patient's long-term health prospects.

"Carrying extra weight can carry forth year to year," said Morton, who is president-elect of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He likened long-term obesity to smoking cigarettes for years, suggesting that the number of years a person remains obese (or smokes) may interact with their degree of obesity (or how much they smoke) to influence his or her likelihood of developing health problems.